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Discussion Starter #1
Picked up one today at Dixon's for $150. .50 caliber, wood stock with a nice trigger and good sparking lock.
Someone put a horrid set of fiber op sights on her. Gonna cobble up a blade and aperture set-up a.s.a.p.
The bore and crown are excellent. Just a touch of finish wear on the edges of the lands.
The lock doesn't have a bridle, but is set up for one. Are these available? I know the rifle's been out of production for some time. The last 2 digits of the serial number is 98. I assume that's year of production.
The hammer/ tumbler/ lock plate is good and tight. Be nice if it stays that way...
A lot less play than any of the TC locks I've had. Funny that.
She's light, well built and points very naturally.
I'm hopeful for good results. Haven't had the best luck with flinters. TC and Lyman's. Hopefully a humble little CVA will do the trick.
Anyone shooting one of these? How's it working for you?
 

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Nice and light are my kinda words anymore ! I have a Lyman Trade Rifle Flintlock that is even getting on the heavy side !! You done good, let us know how it shoots.....
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, I took her to the range and several things became clear.
The lock throws more than enough spark! But I was still getting a noticeable delay in ignition. Primed the pan 1/2 full with ( old) Goex 4f.
I was shooting some 230 gr Hornady XTP's in Harvester crush ribs with 70 gr of 3F Swiss. That load gives 1633 fps from my 24 inch Firehawk. I expect at least the same from this one, with 2 more inches of barrel. Btw, she backs up right smart!
Am currently out of .490s, but will try them too.
I made a beeswax dam between the pan and barrel. Even though it isn't large, the wax didn't help. She got pretty fouled. Durned slotted vent liner...
Anyway... Fired 10 rounds to get acquainted. Best was 1 5/8. Worst was a little over 5. 3 rounds at 50 yards.
I don't do my best with flinters and I'm hoping I can break the jinx with this one.
I'm a 100% muzzleloader hunter and hope to master the flinter. What's the trick? I don't overprime and I know she won't bite me. I also know its physically impossible to flinch as a well tuned lock fires, so I'm doing it before.
Deer are blessed with blood and breath. Targets dont bleed. Before this one goes for a walk, I need the same confidence I have with my Thunderhawk and Firehawk.
I have taken one deer with a flintlock. A Green Mountain ball barreled TC Hawken. Powder piggy! Made a 115 yard shot on a pie bald, no nuts button buck. Broke his neck.
Was aiming for his chest...
 

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I would start with checking the inletting of the lock. The top of the flash pan should visually "split" the flashhole liner in the center of the hole. Also, most of my flinters have the flashpan polished to a mirrorlike finish, seems to help on a couple.

Also pretty important is to eliminate any gaps, both between the lock and barrel,(including frizzen to barrel), and between frizzen and pan. To check frizzen/pan gap remove the lock, hold it up to a light, and there should be no light visible where the frizzen/pan surfaces mate. Any gaps could cause two things. The 4F could fall out of the pan, and/or fall inside the area where the lock and barrel meet. A stiff breeze could also empty the pan through that gap.

Normally "less is more" with pan powder, my entry level Traditions is a little fussy, wants a single hit from the priming flask banked away from the barrel. My Great Plains Rifle has an L&R lock, does not care about how much pan powder is in it, nor how it is positioned in the pan. Both guns go off nearly as fast as a caplock.

I hope this smidgeon of information helps you clear up that slow ignition problem.
 

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Flintlock hunter is providing you with great advice. The high polishing of the lock pan also goes a long way to help prevent moisture from settling in any "mountains\valleys" of the pan.

When hunting, if I've already taken a shot (who....me miss??) I will use a small alcohol wipe patch (buy 'em at the pharmacy....those little packets of wipes for people who give themselves injections) and clean the pan. I open the patch....squeeze the bulk of the alcohol out and then wipe all residue from the pan and under the frizzen. BP residue will attract air moisture like blood does a shark. The alcohol dries almost instantly no matter what the outside temp is. Re-prime and get ready to miss.....errrr.....take your next shot!!

Flint hunting is just plain fun. Enjoy your rifle!!!
 

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I really like Steeltraps idea with the little alchohol wipes! I use it to swab between shots at the range, but never thought of those little packs in the deer stand. Great idea!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all.
The touch hole is nicely centered and slightly high on the pan. Will definately polish the pan too.
I use rubbing alcohol on my between shot patches.
The 4f I have is OLD. Price tag says $9.29... The fellow who gave it to me had a damp basement...
Will try a Swiss 3f prime next time. Finest I have and its fresh.
Will also look into a hex type touch hole liner. The slotted one angles from 10-3:00 so it directs the flash right where I don't want it to go.
Will report back after next range trip.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The hex head liner gave me a bunch of pan flashes. Wasn't expecting that!
Am getting a bridle and screws from Deer Creek. Ought to make the lock last longer.
 

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Regarding the hex vent liner. I like to drill a bevel on the pan side of the liner. Go lightly with the drill and do not go deep. The drilled bevel opens up the liner opening but you can still use a hex wrench to remove and replace the liner for cleaning.
 
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