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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have always used COC with my compound bow and chisel points with my crossbow. Why? Because they say COC have better flesh penetration with lower energy whereas chisel points penetrate bone better but require more energy. At 70 lbs draw, it isn't that I consider my compound bow to be low energy, just that my crossbow is a lot more. So my thinking has been to use the chisel point for better bone penetration with the higher energy crossbow.

This year I'd like to simplify life by switching over to one broadhead for both. To me, the COC broadheads (I use Montec G5s) actually seem to be sturdier due to their monolithic construction and so I am wondering why a COC wouldn't be as good or even better for a crossbow. Better in the sense that it might not break or deform as easily upon impact at higher speeds. Thoughts?
 

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I have heard of fixed blade, mechanical. I have never used mechanical yet, but have used thunderheads, muzzy, ramcat, bear, magnus, and many others. I do sharpen the chisel points on the broadheads, that have them. I believe a dull chisel point losses penetration, going thru the hide, if it is not sharp enough to cut thru the hide and has to punch its way thru. Try pushing a dull chisel tip thru a garbage bag that is folded in half, so it is double its thickness, then sharpen a chisel tip so it cuts its way thru, its a big difference. A hide would worse yet. I have thought that a dull chisel tip may cause a bigger hole in the hide though, when dull, as it would stretch the hide in to the flesh, maybe causing a larger diameter cut to a stretched hide. Hard to explain what I mean in words, as to how stretch would cause a larger hole. I am not talking about dull blades, just the chisel tip on the broadhead, usually like they come from the factory, dull.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
COC = Cut-On-Contact
 

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The best COC heads with bone splitting capability are single bevel heads with a tanto tip. They have been proven to split bone better than cone or chisel tips.


Strickland Helix.

Steelforce Traditional single bevel.

Cutthroat
Grizz Stick Samurai


Understanding the Single Bevel Advantage
Dr. Ed Ashby's 27 years of field research proved that the single bevel broadhead is superior in penetration to the double bevel broadhead, especially when hard bone hits occur. The twisting action of the single bevel broadhead, when it encounters the stiff resistance from bone, creates a powerful rationale force. As the bone pushes against the bevels, the force causes them to twist. This is known as torque. When this force is combined with the bevel from the other side, a tremendous twisting action occurs that splits and shatters the bone. The harder the bone resistance, the greater the applied torque. Once bone is split and shattered, it offers less resistance to the arrow shaft. Less resistance results in deeper arrow penetration and the highest likelihood of a lethal pass-through.
 

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My thoughts are to shoot what you have the most confidence in. Nothing wrong with shooting monoliths out of your crossbow if they fly good. Hard to be the performance of a solid fixed blade broadhead on game.
 

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I use Swhacker 150 grain mechanicals in my crossbow, 3 inch cut. Take my field points off the bolt and screw them on. They fly the same as field points. Pretty uncomplicated. Shot this 175 pound dressed buck at 35 yards, thru shoulder and out other side.
 

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Have you checked out NAP spitfires?
 

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I've always shot Wasp fixed blades. I tried a mechanical once. It opened before arrival with a clean miss. Like DPMS said I'll stick to the girl I took to the dance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Appreciate the replies, but I'm not sure my question is being understood. Basically, I am trying to determine whether there is any meaningful difference between two different types of fixed broadheads with a crossbow: chisel point like Wasp, and a cut-on-contact style like G5 Montec.
 

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Appreciate the replies, but I'm not sure my question is being understood. Basically, I am trying to determine whether there is any meaningful difference between two different types of fixed broadheads with a crossbow: chisel point like Wasp, and a cut-on-contact style like G5 Montec.

Thought my answer was pretty clear and concise for what you asked.
Chisel for bone.....or COC for cutting efficiency?


You get the best of both worlds with a single bevel tanto tip. There is oodles of reading on the subject if you'd like to dig into it.


However, for killing whitetails, screw on a NAP Killzone mechanical and fill your freezer without worry.
 

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Appreciate the replies, but I'm not sure my question is being understood. Basically, I am trying to determine whether there is any meaningful difference between two different types of fixed broadheads with a crossbow: chisel point like Wasp, and a cut-on-contact style like G5 Montec.
Is there a difference? Sure. For whitetails, assuming that is what you are hunting, I don't think the difference between the two is meaningful enough to matter out of todays crossbows. Shoot whichever you have the most confidence in as long as the choice flies good out of your crossbow.
 

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I also have been using the Montec G5s. I have an old Parker that is not real fast, but I've killed several large bucks with them. 215 lb. field dressed at 33 yds. Last year was 225 lb. field dressed, at 45 yds. quartering towards me. Not an easy shot, but I made a good one and he only went 75 yds. Those G5's are straight and solid!
 

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Appreciate the replies, but I'm not sure my question is being understood. Basically, I am trying to determine whether there is any meaningful difference between two different types of fixed broadheads with a crossbow: chisel point like Wasp, and a cut-on-contact style like G5 Montec.

Like dpms said, shoot what flies the best. That said. The biggest advantage of fixed vrs mechanical broadheads is two fold.

Some bows will not throw a fixed blade at high speed without planing, and a subsequent loss of accuracy. A mechanical head has the potential to not only fly properly, many times matching the target tips, but with some of the designs can make very large entry and exit wounds.:plain:

At reasonable, ethical distance, COC and chiselpoints both do the job about the same.
 

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Appreciate the replies, but I'm not sure my question is being understood. Basically, I am trying to determine whether there is any meaningful difference between two different types of fixed broadheads with a crossbow: chisel point like Wasp, and a cut-on-contact style like G5 Montec.
Any well made broadhead shot out of a crossbow will easily pass through a deer regardless of tip type. The main thing to worry about is accuracy. As others have pointed out, fixed blade heads, whether COC or chisel tip, may cause arrows to plane at faster crossbow speeds. Planing will be amplified even more at longer distances, greatly affecting accuracy and group size. That is why many people(myself included) shoot mechanicals out of crossbows. So, if your heads shoot and group well out of both your crossbow and your vert bow, then I don't see any reason why you couldn't shoot the same heads out of both weapons.
 

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I use a COC type broadhead that has a mechanical right behind the COC part. I shot a bull Elk with it last year at 35 yards and had a pass thru which is good for an elk size animal. Never shot it out of my crossbow but have to guess it would be devastating
 

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I use slick tricks and won't use anything else !!!
 
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