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Discussion Starter #1
Butchered pigs last Saturday and I have 16 pounds of pork belly. Cut the bellies into more manageable squares and rubbed with 16 TBLSP Tender quick and 16 TBLSP dark brown sugar. Put in all in a covered stainless steel pot and based on a recipe from an old timer, added a half cup of apple cider vinegar, a pint of water and put it in the fridge. Well the brine now covers the pieces and I added 2 tblsp liquid smoke. The pieces are flipped over each day. As I understand the process, this Saturday, I rinse off the brine and it is ready to cut off the skin and cold smoke or fry up,

I took notice that the nice light pink veins of meat have turned deep red. It is lookin good.
 

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Kinda similar to how I was taught. We use pickling salt, water apple cider vinegar, and brown sugar. Than we pat dry and put a coat of pepper and brown sugar, and cold smoke for 12-18 hrs.
 

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If the cure covers the meat, why the need to flip? With a dry cure I do flip but if they are covered completely why the need?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure, just following instructions. The old timer that helped us butcher, had made bacon for me in the past. Said it was time for me to make it myself and dictated instructions. I made some "buckboard" last spring from his instructions and it was good.
 

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We made some a few years back when Alton Brown did a program on it. Used an old gas range, clothes iron and a cast iron pan for the cold smoking. Turned out realvgood.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
for some reason, I always thought there was some complicated mystical process for curing meats. Then A friend had me try some "buckboard" and it was great. I can't believe how easy it is.

(I have 4 more pigs and a steer coming along. I'm gonna try something a little more challenging, perhaps some pepperoni)
 

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Think your a little late for butchering Zim. I did 2 pigs week after rifle season. 4 hams and 4 slabbs of bacon. I use dry rub something my aunt has been mixing forever. Salt, pepper, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, salt petrie. I cut down in shank and pack than rub out side, bacon just rub both sides. We wrap hams in brown paper and tie tight with fine cord. Then place them in old flower sacks and hang in my storage buiding i use for this purpose. This year to make my bacon less salty i left for a week on board. Then i got some regular hooks from lem and hung. I slices all 4 around a month ago very good and was salty than previous when i did as hams of wrapping them. I cut 1 ham was pretty good but the rest im going to leave much longer to hang. A distant cousin told me they need 8 months to be good.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I read in a book about smoking meats that folks in Southern Virginia started butchering the day after Christmas for the next years Christmas ham. (12 months in prep.) But the book also said some folks used Borax on the outside. An old 1830's cook book advises rubbing the outside of the ham with wood ashes after salting and during the hanging time.

You must have some "long teeth" if you remember flour sacks.
I haven't even heard that term in the last four or five decades. Gotta say, I don't recall ever seeing flour in cloth sacks. Long as I recall only paper.
 

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You can still get flour in cloth sacks at some plain stores.
 
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