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Well, I'm having shoulder issues (recurring impingement syndrome and a bone spur in my bow arm shoulder) and I'm thinking my days of hunting with a vertical bow may soon be drawing to a close. I am starting the process of investigating buying a crossbow. One concern I have is that I hunt exclusively from a climbing tree stand (a Summit Viper to be more specific) and have some concerns about the maneuverability of a crossbow in my tree stand. I'm looking at a compact limb design like a Ten Point. Any thoughts, experiences, helpful hints, etc. you can share would be greatly appreciated.
 

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It is different. Probably the biggest thing is shooting behind the stand is pretty difficult unless you can lean out from the tree. Other than that there isn't much difference.

If you are looking at Tenpoint I would look at the Stealth SS or the Shadow Ultra-lite. Of course since you won't be hunting with it this year, you can wait until after Feb and see what the new bows are. The other thing is if you need a crank the Tenpoint accudraw is the best hands down.
 

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Welcome to the world of crossbows. I also hunt a lot from treestands, rather small portable treestands. One things that is rapidly changing is the length and width of crossbows, which is a great thing for hunters using them. There are getting much narrower and that is certainly a asset when hunting from trees. If a limb hit the tree when shooting, the force can impart some serious harm to the hunter. The larger the diameter of the trunk, the more this comes into play. On smaller trees, you can lean and get the limbs beyond the trunk for shots to the rear. Is it a huge handicap? Not with most of todays bows but it is something to consider.

You are wise to look at TenPoint and their XLT(extreme limb technology)limbs. Very narrow when cocked. Mission is also making some very nice and narrow crossbows.

You may want to look at what TenPoint does with Horton. They bought the name and the rights to some of their technologies when Horton folded. It is anticipated that they will introduce and reverse draw crossbow at the ATA in January. Currently Barnett and Scorpyd make reverse draws but the Scorpyd comes in at $1500. The new Horton reverse draw may be the most anticipated crossbows in years.

Reverse draws offer many advantages over conventional limb models and I prefer them for that reason. They are the best balancing, most maneuverable, and quietest crossbows on the market, IMO.

Just as with vertical bows, I would try to shoot them before buying them. What feels great to one person feels horrible to others. Also, cock them. There are great differences in how some bows cock. Some are easy and some are not so much.

If you are in the market next spring, I will have a lightly used TenPoint Vapor for sale.

Good luck and have fun in your search.
 

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dpms said:
If a limb hit the tree when shooting, the force can impart some serious harm to the hunter.
Yep always a concern of mine. If I remember correctly a fellow member on here had it happen and I believe it knocked him out of the stand.
 

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one thing i noticed when i first used my xbow from my climber….my climber has the bar around you like the summits. a couple years ago i shot at a squirrel. then when i went to reload my xbow, i could barely get it cocked. the location of the safety bar of the stand made it very hard to do. you may want to practice this. you have to lean out over the bar and cock the string. hard to explain but it is quite difficult.
 

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I use a Summit Viper myself and use a Parker Thunderhawk. A fairly narrow xbow. You will have no problem. Yes, recocking and shooting at a hard angle behind you can be problematic but not impossible. What you give up you also gain in other areas. I made a shot 2 years ago at my buck that I would have never been able to make with my bow. Complicated to explain but a bend, lean, twist shot that wasn't happening with my compound.
It's all good!
 

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Comparing dollar for dollar value go with Carbor Exbress Covert I think mine is 14" cocked, and way cheaper then the over priced Tenpoints.
 

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I did smaller and cheaper for stand and now blind. The Buck Commander is a tad unweildy sitting in a tree. My Barnett Raptor FX is 16" axle to axle uncocked, and 12" axle to axle cocked, so right at 14" wide to the limb tips when loaded up. And will cock in the stand without issues.

Came as a package from Gander Mt. 160 lb. 340 fps and weighs 6.5 lbs. Nice IR scope like a Hawke XB SR reticle, claw type sling, rope cocker, bolts and quiver. On sale for $399.99 and a $50.00 off 250 or more special online. So $349.99 plus tax.

Small and lightweight for in a treestand or pop-up blind, or even stalking. Shoots NAP Kill Zone XBow 100gr on 20" Headhunters the same POI as field points.
 

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I have used a Horton out of a climber, hang on, and ladder stands. No issues other than shooting behind the tree I was in. You have to be comfortable relying on your harness and leaning out away from the tree.
I use a Summit Open shot climber and can cock the xbow when I am in the tree, but it is a little awkward.
 

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I've been carrying my son's xbow this year due to elbow issues. The other day I had a doe coming in from behind me. I had to lean off to the side and cant my body to ready for a shot, that never presenter itself. I got to wondering, can you shoot far past horizontal, nearly vertical? I haven't tried during practice yet. What say you?
 

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I was sitting in a pretty big maple yesterday afternoon. I was hunting with the narrow limb TenPoint Vapor. I would say I had about a 45 degree arc behind me where I could not shoot. The tree was big. Smaller tree, smaller arc.
 

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Yes although I wouldn't recommend doing it.

Last time I checked, at app 20ft up and 3yds out, I hit 4in high.

If you do try a vertical shot just remember where your feet are LOL!
 

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ccall29 said:
Sorry. I was referring to the limbs being vertical. As in rotating the xbow past the horizontal plane that it is on.
Just like canting a compound bow or a gun for that matter, the greater the cant the greater your sights/scope will be off.
 

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I always use a Barnett. It has never been too bulky or awkward.
 

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I use a summit with the bar around the front and I have no problem cocking my bow on the inside of the bar. I have a mission 320 and they make the best crank on the market for cocking your bow if you need one. The thing is narrow and short and might be one of the quietest crossbows made.
 

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I drew the bead on a buck a few years ago in which I had to stand up, turn around and take a shot as he was coming behind my stand. I shoot an excalibur axiom, so you need a lot of clearance in front for the limbs when they move forward. I thought I had given enough lean away from the main trunk of the tree but I had not. I had a perfect twenty yard shot that resulted in the scope of the bow meeting my jaw in a very mean way. Vertical bows have many advantages over crossbows in tree stands as I have learned the hard way.
 

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STRUT5A said:
I always use a Barnett. It has never been too bulky or awkward.
I use the Barnett Recruit compound crossbow, and got it because of how much smaller it is in size, but still delivers devastating power. Got it brand new for $200. Very tight design, and really light weight. I use it with my climber and haven't had any issues with maneuverability. I love it
 

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Discussion Starter #20
dpms said:
Welcome to the world of crossbows. I also hunt a lot from treestands, rather small portable treestands. One things that is rapidly changing is the length and width of crossbows, which is a great thing for hunters using them. There are getting much narrower and that is certainly a asset when hunting from trees. If a limb hit the tree when shooting, the force can impart some serious harm to the hunter. The larger the diameter of the trunk, the more this comes into play. On smaller trees, you can lean and get the limbs beyond the trunk for shots to the rear. Is it a huge handicap? Not with most of todays bows but it is something to consider.

You are wise to look at TenPoint and their XLT(extreme limb technology)limbs. Very narrow when cocked. Mission is also making some very nice and narrow crossbows.

You may want to look at what TenPoint does with Horton. They bought the name and the rights to some of their technologies when Horton folded. It is anticipated that they will introduce and reverse draw crossbow at the ATA in January. Currently Barnett and Scorpyd make reverse draws but the Scorpyd comes in at $1500. The new Horton reverse draw may be the most anticipated crossbows in years.

Reverse draws offer many advantages over conventional limb models and I prefer them for that reason. They are the best balancing, most maneuverable, and quietest crossbows on the market, IMO.

Just as with vertical bows, I would try to shoot them before buying them. What feels great to one person feels horrible to others. Also, cock them. There are great differences in how some bows cock. Some are easy and some are not so much.

If you are in the market next spring, I will have a lightly used TenPoint Vapor for sale.

Good luck and have fun in your search.
I sent you a PM about your Vapor.
 
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