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I scout around for mushrooms now & then. The only ones that I can confidently ID and consume are papinkis and sheepshead.

I notice many times that alot of mushrooms are nibbled on/half eaten by forest critters.

I'm just wondering if the poisionous varieties of mushrooms pose the same danger to deer and other creatures.

I've read that squirrels can eat some things which are poisonous to humans.
I've read where dogs have died from munching on mushrooms growing in people's backyards.

Just curious about other's opinions on this topic.
 

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Good question....No some bugs and the small critters can eat some mushrooms that would kill a human... However I don't think the nibbles you see are from deer. Probably squirrel, chipmunks, and fieldmice...However just because you see critters taking bites out of them does not mean that humans can eat them..I'm sure deer and even turkeys eat Morel's but I think they just know what can hurt them and they leave it alone...God gave critters special enzymes and such to combat poisons...

You do know of two good mushrooms.. Research and look up in mushroom books for Chicken Mushrooms (Sulfurs) and of course large puff balls...Many of your bolete family of mushrooms are edible...The mushrooms with the sponge gills. Now never eat any boletes that have red or orange sponge gills. Check out the bolete called the CEP.
 

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Buck - I have a mushroom book but it still doesn't take the fear out of second guessing. A buddy of mine picks redtops from under Pine trees - I stuck with the ole if its red, your dead syndrome...

Wonder how deer know enough to let the schrooms alone.

I have read accounts of folks picking the magic variety of mushrooms from cow pastures, and observing that the cows were somewhat concerned and were keeping a close eye on just exactly how many they were taking. Not sure if that's nonsense - but it would explain the Happy Cow commercials on TV.
 

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Now the boletes that have the red on the top that could be slippery jacks.. But pores or sponge gills are white.. Now Red Tops in the Russula family...Their nickname is SICKNER. Hope your friend is not picking Sickners?

Lactarius family...gives off a milky substance from the bottom of the gills. If you pick one and the milk substance is white.. Nope you don't eat that..But if the milk color is orange then thats most edible type in that family..See it's little things like this that can help ID edible vs non-edible.
Best bet for you so you can learn more is to join one of the two Pa Mushroom Clubs... Eastern Pa Mushroom Association and the Western Pa Mushroom Association...
Thats where you can learn how to ID many edible shrooms..
 

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The best way to learn how to safely identify wild mushrooms is to join a mycological society. You can go on "Forays" to learn how to identify the mushrooms growing where you live. I discovered that there's great variations in how the same species of wild mushrooms look from region to region. If your in NEPA search on Google for the "Susquehanna Valley Mycological Society" or the "Eastern Penn Mushroomers". After joining the first group and learning from the forays, my husband and I safely identify about 20 delicious edibles. Black trumpets are especially good with venison!
 
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