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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone ever plant this? I got the itch to try something different in my fall plot this year. Here is what PSU says about it.

Crimson clover
Crimson clover is a legume, and fixes substantial amounts of nitrogen, although not as much as hairy vetch. It grows fast in the fall and, therefore, does not profit much from a companion seeded with it. Just like vetch and annual ryegrass, it may winterkill if established too early in the fall. For greatest success, plant by September 1st in the central, and September 15th in the southern parts of the state. Drill 15 pounds per acre of seed, 1/4 to 1/2 inch deep. It's then likely to provide at least 80 pounds per acre nitrogen for next years' summer crop. Use crimson/berseem Rhizobium inoculant.
 

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In my neck of the Pa. woods I seen about a 10 acre field planted in this not knowing the reason. But hardly ever seen a deer in it. The adjoining fields in wheat and grass is where all the deer was. Maybe just luck of the drawl but I don't know. I will say from experience I have had good luck with Ladino clover.
 

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No personal experience with the Crimson Clover....but I have read about food plot guys that used it in their plots to help with nitrogen fixin' and adding a variety to the plot.

I have also read where it is used by farmers in cover crop mixes....for the same N fixin' reason.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I bought a bag to try out. Probably will plant around the 1st of Sept. May split the plot with some winter wheat.
 

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I bought a bag to try out. Probably will plant around the 1st of Sept. May split the plot with some winter wheat.
I am sure you will, but let us know how it works out. If nothing else, it will make for some pretty pictures in the spring and you will have some extra N for your next planting!
 

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The excitement of food plotting is trying something new, I'm always trying new seeds and combinations , Ya never know until you try, good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I did plant the plot last Thursday or Friday. May be a touch early for it, but it was a decent break in the rain so I put it in. With all the rain and the time between plowing and when I disced it up there was quite a bit of grass, so that is the green you see in the plot.

Untitled by cspot12, on Flickr
 

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I’ve planted it and although it improves the N2 in the soil, deer didn’t care for it. It grows rather tall for clover and truthfully creates a beautiful red plot in June. In my opinion however there are much better clovers to plant.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As an update the clover is up 2-3 inches but hasn't taken off yet. A little disappointed in that, but I will see what happens.
 

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Clover establishes slow especially because it is building its root base and also at this time of the year it typically does not grow fast when it is moving towards a more dormant stage. If anything top dress now with a fertilizer with a high P & K such as 5-26-26. Next spring you will see nice growth even if you do not top dress
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Clover establishes slow especially because it is building its root base and also at this time of the year it typically does not grow fast when it is moving towards a more dormant stage. If anything top dress now with a fertilizer with a high P & K such as 5-26-26. Next spring you will see nice growth even if you do not top dress
Yes I am used to that with perennial clover. Since this is an annual, I was expecting to see it start taking off sooner.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Pretty much this experiment has been one of my bigger disappointments so far in food plotting. The clover has never really taken off like I hoped or expected. Lots of weeds in it now too. The deer are eating it some. I will snap a pic sometime, but if you imagine a plot with some clover that is 4 or 5 inches talk and a bunch of weeds then you pretty much have it. LOL.
 

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Pretty much this experiment has been one of my bigger disappointments so far in food plotting. The clover has never really taken off like I hoped or expected. Lots of weeds in it now too. The deer are eating it some. I will snap a pic sometime, but if you imagine a plot with some clover that is 4 or 5 inches talk and a bunch of weeds then you pretty much have it. LOL.

Funny. I treated my lawn the other day and was thinking “ I can’t get clover out of my lawn and grass out of my foodplot”. We gave up on clover unless we seed it into a good mix.
 
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