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You may shoot coyotes anytime of year with a hunting license if you are lawfully hunting for a game species. If you are targeting coyotes such as night hunting or while targeting coyotes in daylight and not hunting for game animals you need a fur takers license this information is in your hunting and trapping digest. In answer to your feral cat question, if you get caught shooting feral cats unless they are killing your animals you will probably get pinched for cruelty to animals. They should be allowed to be removed from the environment because they are one of the biggest vectors for rabies and they are very hard on wildlife.
Outside of a big game season, it's lawful to use a hunting or furtaker license even if you are "targeting" coyotes.

From the Digest:
"The porcupine is classified as a furbearer, but, like the coyote, it can be hunted with either a hunting or furtaker license."

Title 58: FURTAKING—HUNTING

Species
Coyote—(Outside of any big game season)May be taken with a hunting license or a furtaker’s license.
Coyote—(During any big game season)May be taken while lawfully hunting big game or with a furtaker’s license.
 

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Well, yes I am. Apparently that makes you uncomfortable.

I suppose it's natural for the credulous to confuse curiosity (whether it killed the cat or not) with affinity.
LMAO! Yea, uncomfortable. LMAO!
 

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Do you have any supporting data?
We estimate that free-ranging domestic cats kill 1.3–4.0 billion birds and 6.3–22.3 billion mammals annually. Un-owned cats, as opposed to owned pets, cause the majority of this mortality. Our findings suggest that free-ranging cats cause substantially greater wildlife mortality than previously thought and are likely the single greatest source of anthropogenic mortality for US birds and mammals. Scientifically sound conservation and policy intervention is needed to reduce this impact.

I can send you the complete article from Nature Communications if you like.
 

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Taken from Web MD:

Though people may mostly associate rabies with dogs, it’s a virus that can affect any mammal — including cats. In fact, rabies affects more cats than dogs in the United States. The virus can be passed on to other animals or humans and is fatal if not treated before symptoms appear. But thanks to vaccines, rabies is also preventable and now rare in house pets.
When a cat does get rabies, it's usually from the bite of an infected wild animal. Raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes are common rabies carriers. The more contact your cat has with wild animals, the higher the risk of their infection.

This is why I shoot every cat I see when out in the desert, or wooded areas. No thanks are necessary.
 

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Taken from Web MD:

Though people may mostly associate rabies with dogs, it’s a virus that can affect any mammal — including cats. In fact, rabies affects more cats than dogs in the United States. The virus can be passed on to other animals or humans and is fatal if not treated before symptoms appear. But thanks to vaccines, rabies is also preventable and now rare in house pets.
When a cat does get rabies, it's usually from the bite of an infected wild animal. Raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes are common rabies carriers. The more contact your cat has with wild animals, the higher the risk of their infection.

This is why I shoot every cat I see when out in the desert, or wooded areas. No thanks are necessary.
https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/location/usa/surveillance/wild_animals.html

"Wild animals accounted for 92.7% of reported cases of rabies in 2018. Bats were the most frequently reported rabid wildlife species (33% of all animal cases during 2018), followed by raccoons (30.3%), skunks (20.3%), and foxes (7.2%). "

According to the CDC document, domestic animals accounted for about 7 % of all rabies cases in 2018. If your goal is to reduce rabies, there are many more impactful targets. Living in Arizona, if your goal is to have an increasingly positive impact on society through mammal harvesting, maybe consider surveilling the border.
 

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Living in Arizona, if your goal is to have an increasingly positive impact on society through mammal harvesting, maybe consider surveilling the border.
You will get no argument from me on that comment. Now, all WE have to do is convince the liberals, and I have no problem in shooting an invading species, be they four-legged or two. What say you?
 

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https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/location/usa/surveillance/wild_animals.html

"Wild animals accounted for 92.7% of reported cases of rabies in 2018. Bats were the most frequently reported rabid wildlife species (33% of all animal cases during 2018), followed by raccoons (30.3%), skunks (20.3%), and foxes (7.2%). "

According to the CDC document, domestic animals accounted for about 7 % of all rabies cases in 2018. If your goal is to reduce rabies, there are many more impactful targets. Living in Arizona, if your goal is to have an increasingly positive impact on society through mammal harvesting, maybe consider surveilling the border.
The CDC statistics on rabies is probably accurate for across the United States but while Hammer47 and I were still working we periodically (at least once or twice a year) got a printout of all confirmed rabies cases across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It showed the number of positive rabies cases by species for every county and statewide.

As Hammer47 said cats were ALWAYS, year after year, one of the highest positive rabies vectors across the state. It was usually the second highest rabies vector, after the raccoon. There were a couple years when it might have been third, behind raccoons and skunks, but most years it was the second highest in the state.

The coyote, though highly persecuted for its own predatory behavior, was probably responsible for removing some of the worst predators of both small and big game this area ever had.

Back in the seventies and early eighties the coyote population in this area was just getting started and still pretty low. The number of people still coming to hunting camps was still high though and the laws on releasing both dogs and cats into the wild were pretty lax. Because of that many people ended up dropping unwanted dogs and cats out in the remote areas thinking they would either fend for themselves or find a new home.

The result was many of these remote areas were being overrun with both feral dogs and feral cats. I remember during some of our harsh winters the Clarion River would be frozen over and fairly deep snow on the river sidehills. There would be small packs of dogs running deer off the hillsides, out onto the ice where they eventually caught the deer, hamstringing it and then eating them from the hindquarters forward while they were still alive. It was really a sad scene to watch. It wasn't just a few dogs or a few deer either. I remember a couple a few winters when we were talking about dozens of different packs of dogs and sometimes close to a hundred deer between Elk and Jefferson Counties. We would work the river and shoot dogs when we could but back then those packs of dogs were killing way more adult deer pretty much every year than I saw from coyotes during my entire career. I am also sure those packs of feral dogs were killing both fawns and adult deer throughout the year but probably most of those incidents went undiscovered and unknown.

Feral, once someone's pet, were also roaming all over the game lands and national forest. We shot many of them while out on our patrols but they got so wild they would take off as soon as you saw it and they were usually long gone from sight before you could take them out. No one has any idea how much game and birdlife they taking out each year.

But, as the coyote numbers increased the feral dog and feral cat problems came to an end. I haven't seen a feral dog or cat problem in our remote forested areas since the coyote and bobcat get fully established in this part of the state. I'll accept coyotes and bobcats over feral dogs and cats anytime the question or subjects come up.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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The CDC statistics on rabies is probably accurate for across the United States but while Hammer47 and I were still working we periodically (at least once or twice a year) got a printout of all confirmed rabies cases across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. It showed the number of positive rabies cases by species for every county and statewide.

As Hammer47 said cats were ALWAYS, year after year, one of the highest positive rabies vectors across the state. It was usually the second highest rabies vector, after the raccoon. There were a couple years when it might have been third, behind raccoons and skunks, but most years it was the second highest in the state.

The coyote, though highly persecuted for its own predatory behavior, was probably responsible for removing some of the worst predators of both small and big game this area ever had.

Back in the seventies and early eighties the coyote population in this area was just getting started and still pretty low. The number of people still coming to hunting camps was still high though and the laws on releasing both dogs and cats into the wild were pretty lax. Because of that many people ended up dropping unwanted dogs and cats out in the remote areas thinking they would either fend for themselves or find a new home.

The result was many of these remote areas were being overrun with both feral dogs and feral cats. I remember during some of our harsh winters the Clarion River would be frozen over and fairly deep snow on the river sidehills. There would be small packs of dogs running deer off the hillsides, out onto the ice where they eventually caught the deer, hamstringing it and then eating them from the hindquarters forward while they were still alive. It was really a sad scene to watch. It wasn't just a few dogs or a few deer either. I remember a couple a few winters when we were talking about dozens of different packs of dogs and sometimes close to a hundred deer between Elk and Jefferson Counties. We would work the river and shoot dogs when we could but back then those packs of dogs were killing way more adult deer pretty much every year than I saw from coyotes during my entire career. I am also sure those packs of feral dogs were killing both fawns and adult deer throughout the year but probably most of those incidents went undiscovered and unknown.

Feral, once someone's pet, were also roaming all over the game lands and national forest. We shot many of them while out on our patrols but they got so wild they would take off as soon as you saw it and they were usually long gone from sight before you could take them out. No one has any idea how much game and birdlife they taking out each year.

But, as the coyote numbers increased the feral dog and feral cat problems came to an end. I haven't seen a feral dog or cat problem in our remote forested areas since the coyote and bobcat get fully established in this part of the state. I'll accept coyotes and bobcats over feral dogs and cats anytime the question or subjects come up.

Dick Bodenhorn
Well said Dick. I haven`t seen a wild dog in the woods for many years. What are you seeing now a days? Wonder why their populations are down? Interesting stuff. Thank you.
 

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Well said Dick. I haven`t seen a wild dog in the woods for many years. What are you seeing now a days? Wonder why their populations are down? Interesting stuff. Thank you.
Around here the coyote populations have declined as the bobcat numbers increased but there are still a fair number of both coyote and bobcat.

In this area the coyote populations increased through the 70s, 80 and into the 90s. Then the bobcat numbers started increasing. Since the coyote and bobcat are pretty much equal predators and working the same prey base it only stands to reason that coyote numbers would decline some as bobcat numbers increased.

I witnessed something yesterday while out blueberry picking from a coyote I had never before experienced. I saw a coyote on a forest road near the berry patch. He bolted off as soon as he saw me, then after just a short distance he turned around and barked at me. It sounded just like a house dog barking, no yipping or howling mixed in just straight out barking. As I continued toward him he took off into the brush. Once out of sight he barked like that for a half hour. If I hadn't seen him I would have thought someone's dog had run off and was out there in the woods, maybe hurt or trapped somehow, and barking to get help or attention.

Over the decades of my career and outdoor experiences I have heard thousands of coyotes barking but always before they had some yips and howls mixed in. Not this one though just straight out barking like a dog. Almost made me wonder if he hasn't learned that to maybe attract a dog to come investigate the other dog in the area.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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Around here the coyote populations have declined as the bobcat numbers increased but there are still a fair number of both coyote and bobcat.

In this area the coyote populations increased through the 70s, 80 and into the 90s. Then the bobcat numbers started increasing. Since the coyote and bobcat are pretty much equal predators and working the same prey base it only stands to reason that coyote numbers would decline some as bobcat numbers increased.

I witnessed something yesterday while out blueberry picking from a coyote I had never before experienced. I saw a coyote on a forest road near the berry patch. He bolted off as soon as he saw me, then after just a short distance he turned around and barked at me. It sounded just like a house dog barking, no yipping or howling mixed in just straight out barking. As I continued toward him he took off into the brush. Once out of sight he barked like that for a half hour. If I hadn't seen him I would have thought someone's dog had run off and was out there in the woods, maybe hurt or trapped somehow, and barking to get help or attention.

Over the decades of my career and outdoor experiences I have heard thousands of coyotes barking but always before they had some yips and howls mixed in. Not this one though just straight out barking like a dog. Almost made me wonder if he hasn't learned that to maybe attract a dog to come investigate the other dog in the area.

Dick Bodenhorn
Funny you shared this story cause 3 years ago I had the exact same thing happen to me. The coyote would just stay there and bark and bark. No yips no howls just straight bark. I would approach the coyote but still from a good distance and it would dart off another 50 yards and do the same thing till I approached then move off again and bark till I came to it. I finally came to a conclusion on what was going on, as 2 weeks later the exact same thing happened again around the exact same area and the coyote took me the exact same direction. I found their den and it was leading me away from it till he or she was satisfied that I was far enough away then the barking would stop and the coyote would be gone. Probably circled back to it’s den. This the only reason I could come up with after finding their den site.
 
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