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Have always heard coyotes are “active” travelers, but I hear folks talking about hunting specific farms or areas.

What’s the skinny?
 

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Don't know what you mean by active travelers but out here they are fairly territorial. I have killed many coyotes in the same general area over many years. As long as the food supply is sufficient for them they will hang around.
 

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They have a large home range that they will patrol and guard against intruders while attempting to stay out of range of others. It isn't a one day thing, might take weeks. If they have a large food source (dead deer) they are going to stay nearby to protect and consume it, maybe a couple to a few days. So depending on food they find that will determine how long it takes to go through their area. For their hunting to be productive they won't choose the same route each time, they may travel in the same area but use a slightly different route. They have areas they prefer and frequent them more often. But during this time of year they aren't denning like a gray fox or raccoon. On my property in the snow I'll usually find a single or pair coming thru about 10-14 days, might see their tracks 2 days in a row and then not again for 2 weeks.
 

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They have to have the three things that man has. Food, Shelter, Security. I like when there is snow on the ground (6-8 inches) because the coyotes will find the deer core areas then. find the deer after deer season in their core areas and the coyotes will be close by. They will travel railroad tracks, river banks and stream banks. they will use less energy when they travel from area A to B, in other words you won't see them jumping over stubble corn.. they will come down a trail from a wood lot. Sometimes they will travel the county roads to your calling.. just like the man the human they think. well some men think,,, you all know what it's like to walk across a stubble field of cut corn instead of coming along the edge..when you hunt our Pa coyotes remember your a mammal and they are a mammal.. When you run out of food you go get some more. They move on to the next area that is abundant..
 

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Coyote, Red Fox, Grey Fox & Coon travel picked corn fields on a daily basis. Why? While checking out Groundhog holes or their old den site or just passing thru. Predators travel between the rows, the easiest way to travel a corn field, standing or picked.
I called and killed many predators in picked corn and called and killed many out from standing corn. Just saying.

When I call heavy brush, the thick stuff, Predators appear. They find a way to me. But corn field travel is easy between the rows. They will change rows, sometimes, when approaching a call. When they hit the end rows (oppisite direction) they will have a zigzag approach.

I do make Canine sets (trapping) in corn stuble as well...
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Have always heard coyotes are “active” travelers, but I hear folks talking about hunting specific farms or areas.
What’s the skinny?
I agree with cm9. Find 'em in the same area season after season. Why? Like uncle buck stated, Food, Water, Shelter. That usually means cover, the thickest, remote place around.
Coyotes don't need to travel far, for the necessities, in most parts of Pennsylvania.

Here today gone tomorrow, is what I hear often about Coyote.
For the next two months, pups will be leaving parents and home range. So they will leave a void in that area.
Plus, hound hunters, trappers & predator callers will reduce population as the season progresses.

One main factor I experience from Coyote disappearance from an area is human pressure. No only due to fur season, but archery season, early muzzleloader season, small game hunters and so on.
The arrival of Pennsylvania's hunting seasons puts people in the woods hence; moving Coyotes to different areas by human pressure. Not saying these archery, muzzleloader or small game hunter are hunting or chasing Coyote, but just their presents in the woods on a daily basis is enough to move Coyotes out.
 

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Big woods dogs must be different. Where camp is in the mountains when deer hunting sometimes you will go 2 weeks without seeing a track in the snow then bam the entire mountain is covered in tracks and they are howling all night long. It seems they are either there or they are not. But when they are there it’s not just 1 or 2 it’s a pile of them. Seen as many as 9 travel together already. Days when coyotes are abundant up there you can bet on not seeing any deer.
 

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I live on the mountain, and quite often hear the yotes at nite and early morning. They have been there a good many years and the deer herd is still pretty solid. The turkeys however are dwindling away. We used to have a pile of turkey in the area. I know the yotes aren't the only animals that prey on the turkeys but the flocks are few and far between since the yotes moved in....
 

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Big woods dogs must be different. Where camp is in the mountains when deer hunting sometimes you will go 2 weeks without seeing a track in the snow then bam the entire mountain is covered in tracks and they are howling all night long. It seems they are either there or they are not. But when they are there it’s not just 1 or 2 it’s a pile of them. Seen as many as 9 travel together already. Days when coyotes are abundant up there you can bet on not seeing any deer.
How long are they in the area after they return from 2 weeks?

Here again, you must reason things out. Why are they gone for 2 weeks? Is hunting and fur season in? Is there human pressure. Did the pups disperse? Are they two mountains away or a hundred miles? No food? and so on.
Why did they return? For how long do the stay? Are they following Deer heard? Did they return to clean up gut piles? Is there low human pressure after Coyotes return?

It's hard for folks in southern Pa. that own a cabin in the northern Pa. to figure out Coyote patterns at cabin. It's tough without living there.
One factor I see is the lack of food a Coyote has in many parts of northern Pa. During winter month, prey is low.
 
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