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So I set-up looking down a trail leading into a bottom where I knew coyots were hanging out and right out at dark I let out a single howl. A couple minutes later about 4 of them opened and man did they open. They went on for about 3 or 4 mintues straight yipping and howling. About a minute after they stopped I let out a challenge howl and didnt hear anything for about 5 mintues when I heard a few barks farther away then the original group howl. So I waited about 10 minutes and starting ki ying; heard a few more distant barks and that was it. I sat tight for about 15 mintues then left. Was my sequence ok or should I have gone abot it differently? Thanks!
 

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Those barks are often a "yo dude, we know you are trying to kill us, stop it"....

Believe me, Ive been barked at many times. Just last week I called in a pair. 60 yards broadside in the dark. No light needed in the snow. They were clear as day. The youngster I took along couldn't get one in the scope in time without spooking them. They took off, got into thick woods, and barked at us. Its not uncommon.
 

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My advice is this. My advice may be wrong also. When they respond to your howl, give them plenty of time. Let curiousity work to your advantage. Let them come and check out the new kid on the block. Too much vocalizing on your end can be enough for them to decide not to check you out, or decide that you aren't real. Sometimes less is more.

Ive often found that coyotes that respond right away to a howl, often wont come in. But wjen you howl and get no response, they are sometimes hurrying to get to you. When that happens, they are often there in a hurry. These are only my experiences and may not be fact.
 
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