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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was wondering something today. I know that is dangerous. I know in PA we are not allowed to use bird feathers or any other animal part in the open. What if I took Cotton and dyed it a brown color and ripped it and spread it around a dirt hole. Is this legal? also, what about fake birds? Sorry, slow day at work. Thanks
 

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What you should do is take that cotton ball, soak it in your favorite lure (a good food lure works best) and put it down a dirt hole...Easy!

1, Dying a cotton ball will give it a foreign odor and scare more target animals away than drawing them in.
2, Ripping it apart and scattering over top the ground is subject to wind and will just blow away.
3, By the time you dye and rip apart cotton balls at one set, you could have two or three sets made with a simple dirt hole set with a scented cotton ball in the hole.

Efficiency is the name of the game in trapping. Don't over think it. Although, experimenting can be fun too!
 

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Hern said:
...and spread it around a dirt hole. Is this legal?
No. That is littering.
Stop it, it's not litering if it's part of the set. But then again, you knew that.
Why would a person dye it though? I mean what's better contrast than white on brown?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I see videos of some Trappers using fur around the dirt hole to attract Bobcat and Fisher. This is why I was asking about the cotton. I will also be using some red tinsel this year.
 

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Down holes and in cubbies are no problem since they're not visible from the arial predators. Similar to spreading cattail fluff all over a set to imitate feathers, that would be imitated animal parts. Just my perspective whatever the interpretation just be sure not to attract birds of prey.
 

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Got to agree with Hale too.
Shredding some cotton for eye appeal is no more littering than pealing a fresh stick to attract a beaver.

The problem with cotton is that it is going to look like tufts of fur scattered about, and Andrew already covered the issue with that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Fairchild #17 said:
The young man nailed it.
You have wisdom beyond your years.
Just spoke to Commission in Harrisburg. He spoke to one of there Attorneys. It states animal or animal by product. Cotton is fine. Question answered! Thanks for the input.
 

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There ya go folks. That is exactly what the book says. Animal, animal by product or replicas of that, meaning faux fur. Not cotton, cattail or even balled up dead grass. If you start saying you are not allowed to use natural visual attractants like mentioned, you better not use any light colored sticks either it might look like a bone!

Thanks for the clarification.
 

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.....meat, animal products, or their facsimiles.

Shredded cotton, dyed or not to resemble animal fur to attract predators to your set, is indeed a facsimile of an animal product. What else are you trying to represent?

The attorney you referenced doesn't know what he's talking about. Probably never set a trap in his life either. The answer is right in your handbook, it doesn't take a law degree to interpret it.
 

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Funny the bone thing was mentioned. There for a while people tried slivers of white PVC out in the open to resemble a sun bleached rib bone for eye appeal. This is also illegal. The main thing is to keep hawks out of traps whether the means are legal or not because it will only lead to more restrictions and shine a negative light on trapping.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Fairchild #17 said:
.....meat, animal products, or their facsimiles.

Shredded cotton, dyed or not to resemble animal fur to attract predators to your set, is indeed a facsimile of an animal product. What else are you trying to represent?

The attorney you referenced doesn't know what he's talking about. Probably never set a trap in his life either. The answer is right in your handbook, it doesn't take a law degree to interpret it.
I called Harrisburg. They called me back after speaking to THEIR Attorney. As in Game Commission Attorney. They write the laws and they enforce the laws. Who else should I ask?
 

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Ask your local WCO, if he says the cotton is ok, get it in writing and go for it.

There really is no need for this tactic when we know where his feet will be.
If his feet are close enough to see your brown cotton it should be close enough to discover the set. There are several ways to visibly attract attention to your set without risking a citation or possibly a long delay on an already long day.
 

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Personally I go off my own interpretation of the law. You could call three different people within the PGC and get three different answers to the same very specific question. At the end of the day, most times your district magistrate will have the last say, not your local WCO.
 

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Get it in writing and magistrate will be on your side if it comes to that.
Interpretation of some laws often vary.
 
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