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Discussion Starter #1
When I bought my cabin I inherited a sako riihimaki in .222 from the previous owner of the place. I thought it was a great score but I never really paid much attention. It just hung over the mantle where he left it. Over the summer I tried to shoot it and almost blew my face off. The guy drilled his own scope mounts and left holes behind the bolt and just in front of the action. Gas and unburied powder seap out. Of coarse he never warned me. I was thinking to save the riffle converting it to .223 since I would have to buy a new barrel anyway. Does anyone have any experience or know how to do this?
 

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The holes can be plugged. Sounds like a ruined expensive Sako rifle. You need a gunsmith to look at it and answer your questions.
 

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Im not exactly sure where the holes are by your description. If "behind the bolt" is refering to somewhere on the rear bridge of the action, those holes should not cause any gas blowback. The holes "in front of the action" sound like they are drilled in the barrel. If those holes are drilled deep enough they could have entered the chamber/bore area and caused the leaking gases. Then a rebarrel would be needed.

A rebarrel would cost you around $200.00+ for the barrel. Then another $200.00+ for the gunsmith to chamber, cut threads, and crown. Reblueing would be $100.00+. Depending on what you want there could be some other costs. If you want to drill and tap for sights it would be around $25.00+ per hole. If the barrel has a non standard contour that you want matched it could cost another $100.00+.

One other thing you can check. Are you sure its a .222, could it be a .222 Mag? The way you describe the incedent, it sounds like a case failure.

Good luck, Tony
 

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I agree with stoolshooter. Take that gun to a good smith and have it checked out. I would have him cast the chamber and slug the bore to make sure the rifle is really a within-spec .222 and is safe to fire.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the help guys do you know a good gunsmith I can use. I hunt in Wayne county and live 15 min from philly, so someone in either area.
 

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ChrisPhilly said:
Thanks for the help guys do you know a good gunsmith I can use. I hunt in Wayne county and live 15 min from philly, so someone in either area.
Can't recommend anyone in either place but can tell you DO NOT use Hemlock Gunshop on 590 between Hamlin and Hawley
 

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Could be the guy knew the gun was bad.If I had camp I wouldn't leave a gun of value there if I wasn't nearby hunting or fishing.I probably wouldn't have a firearm of any value above a fireplace.Smoke,moisture and heat.Guns above mantles are for the most part a decoration from what I have seen.He probably left it there for that reason.By all means get it checked.The action should be worth a few bucks at least.
 

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I agree with the possibility of it being a 222RM Sako stamped the caliber on top the barrel in front of the reciever ring and the stamping can be very easily blocked from view by a scope and mount.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Honestly it's a case of someone playing gunsmith. There's no scope on it but it looks like he tried to make his own.
 

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ChrisPhilly said:
I forgot to ask, would you switch to .223?
Personally I would not, but I would bet I'm 1 in 1000. The .222 and/or .222mag are just less common cartridges and for me thats why I would not change it. For most people the 223 would be a easier fit.

Good luck, Tony
 

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Tony300wby said:
ChrisPhilly said:
I forgot to ask, would you switch to .223?
Personally I would not, but I would bet I'm 1 in 1000. The .222 and/or .222mag are just less common cartridges and for me thats why I would not change it. For most people the 223 would be a easier fit.

Good luck, Tony
I'm with Tony. I grew up shooting an old Savage 340 in .222 and I'll just hand it down to my son when I die. I also have a .223 and see little advantage to it other than ammo availability for groundhogs and predators. If a gunsmith determines your gun is in good working order, I'd keep it as is and enjoy it.
 

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leave it as is, the rifle is not worth the cost of a re-chamber. Just take it to a qualified smith and find out how to make it shoot as is.
 

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PeteMacMahon said:
leave it as is, the rifle is not worth the cost of a re-chamber. Just take it to a qualified smith and find out how to make it shoot as is.
Why do you say this?
 

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RobOz said:
PeteMacMahon said:
leave it as is, the rifle is not worth the cost of a re-chamber. Just take it to a qualified smith and find out how to make it shoot as is.
Why do you say this?
Because:

1) I feel the same as Tony300wby & basdjs above. Everyone has .223s but not so many have .222
2) Seems to me that it's an abused beater, based on the description given. Not work the money and effort, unless it has really remarkable wood.
 
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