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I am starting to look for a new bird dog. My GSP is almost 10 and has never been a good house dog because she was never house broken. My kids REALLY want a new dog. One that can be in the house with us and not trash the place or my kids, ages 7, 4, and 14 months. I love my short hair and am leaning to getting another one but I'm worried because of my current dog. I didn't get her until she was 4 so I wasn't able to work with her on house training and she never seemed to get the concept of it when I tried. She is a GREAT hunter and is fantastic around the kids which is why I'm leaning to get another one. My questions are:

What do you guys recommend for a bird dog/house dog?

Do you recommend a puppy or a started dog?

Any recommendations on where to get one?

Thanks for the help.
 

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I have an english setter, couch potato at home, all business in the field.
 

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House dog?....then puppy versus started, of any measure of start.

Breed?....depends upon what you prefer to follow and look at in the field, what you hunt and how you enjoy your particular hunting or bird hunting.
Oomph varies within breed as well so be aware of that fact and expect some "trashing" with any puppy worthy of the name...puppy.

I would always trip the setter way but in truth many breeds and lines within breeds will satisfy.
Look to the parents and to the realities that each dog delivers.
I would also not ignore the possibility of a Lab, in many ways they define the word...Dog.

Take your time in choosing....speed kills.
 

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For a kid/wife loving house dog who is always ready to hunt you can't beat a Brittany.Do you and your family have the time to train for house manners and a place to get plenty of birds for field training?
 

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I'll never own a long haired dog. Way too much maintenance every time you hunt.
 

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I would also like to mention english pointers to this list. I currently have four of them in the house and they are a wonderful breed in the house and the field, if you are truly looking for a BIRD DOG! They have no interest in fur such as rabbits or deer or anything else other than birds! And they are great with kids and other dogs as well.
 

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GSP's has a wide range of bloodlines and if you choose the right bloodline then you should be able to get a nice house dog. I would also recommend staying away from ALPHA puppies also.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the replies so far. I hunt a lot of birds and have hunted with many different types of dogs. I have looked at setters in the past for my next dog but I am yet to get my next dog. As far as time to train at home. My wife is a stay at home mom and is willing and able to do some of the daily training. I also own my own business and the pup will most likely be coming to the office to work with me most every day so someone will be with it most all the time. As for access to birds, I have raised pheasants, quail, and chucker for the last 8 years and always have some on the property. Not to mention we have a few hundred acres that hold good grouse and wood cock. My GSP has had over 1200 birds killed over her. I also will probably enlist the help of a professional bird dog trainer to help make this a better dog. Thanks again for all the help and please keep it coming. The main thing I am looking for is help with the "house dog" part of it.
 

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Sounds like the perfect home for whatever breed you decide on.A well trained Brittany,in addition to being a great house and hunting dog can be an excellent receptionist and office manager.
 

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Anybody can make a case for any of the breeds, and there are pros and cons to pups vs. older dogs.

Personally, I'd get a started Pointer and make sure I knew as much as possible what I had. Second choice would be a started Setter. Just my two cents.
 

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I am partial to setters myself and will be getting my 3rd one in June. All/most breeds are nice but, but any dog in the house or field is what YOU make of them.
 

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A few hundred acres with grouse, huh
I'll gladly volunteer my setter ( and myself of course) to come up and let you get to know her.


Check in with Pointer (Vince) at On Point Outfitters, he has both short haired EP and long haired ES. Either way, you'll be in good hands.

Lost
 

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MSF,
If you like Setters you might want to Check out
a Gordon Setter, I have 2 of them and both are serious Grouse dogs and very layed back around the house, may male Gordon is 11 years old now, and still acts like a big goof, the female
is all business in the woods and a very loving animal at home. Just another gun dog breed for you to consider.
Pine Creek/Dave
 

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A tired dog is a good house dog. The majority of the sporting dogs have a great deal of energy. Unless you burn that energy off, they find ways of doing it.

Plenty of exercise and some basic obedience will make any of the sporting breeds a decent house dog.
 

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Pine-Creek said:
MSF,
If you like Setters you might want to Check out
a Gordon Setter, I have 2 of them and both are serious Grouse dogs and very layed back around the house, may male Gordon is 11 years old now, and still acts like a big goof, the female
is all business in the woods and a very loving animal at home. Just another gun dog breed for you to consider.
Pine Creek/Dave
PCD,
Do they respond well to a reliable shock collar?
 

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I love shorthair dogs for hunting except in the house, there hair is tough to get out of things compared to a long hair.(My FIL has a shorthair) Also if its going to be a house dog I prefer smaller so thats why I went to a britt. Some of the best bloodlines for britts in the country are bred right here in the northeast also. Just another thought for ya....
 

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Teddy9 said:
Anybody can make a case for any of the breeds, and there are pros and cons to pups vs. older dogs.

Personally, I'd get a started Pointer and make sure I knew as much as possible what I had. Second choice would be a started Setter. Just my two cents.
Dennis,
I hope Max empties out on your keyboard.

. . .

Setter or pointer.

Don't buy into the "high-strung breed" myth. Any dog that gets its fair share of regular activity won't cause problems in the house. If there's a routine of activity for them, they'll save it for then. To illustrate, when I drove to CT to pick up a pup, I brought the mom back to PA drop off at a trainer for the breeder. I took our little Corolla to save on gas (since I also had booked a room being Memorial Day weekend not wanting traffic to cause me to miss my window of time to pick it up) and could only fit one kennel in the back seats. The breeder told me just put a towel down on the front seat and she'll curl up and sleep the whole time. Now mom was a younger field trial dog, totally unfamiliar with me so I was pretty skeptical. I thought what the heck, it'll make a great story if he's wrong. Danged if that dog wasn't curled-up, lights out before I even pulled out of Flaherty Trial Ground's driveway. She stood up, circled and laid back down one time in 3.5 hours, and left me alone in and after the line at McDonald's drive-thru. All this took place after she'd already rode from central NH down to CT that same morning. I know plenty of guys with extremely athletic couch potatoes, but these are also the guys that run their dogs regularly all year.

A great way to find a started dog with all the "tools" out of good breedings are field trial washouts. They'll vary in age and availability. They're not duds, but usually lack enough of something trivial for a gun dog or would actually even be a desired trait such as "checking back in too often." FT guys keep dogs that'll win, if dog pulls it's tail, checks back in too often... so on and so forth, they're not going to keep feeding, investing time into it and paying entry fees for it when it's not going to win regardless of how good of a meat dog and buddy it is or could be.
 

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Gentlemen,
As a matter of fact Gordon Setters take very well to T&B
collars, they are easily trained to Beeper Commands and
seldom if ever need disciplined, they react postitively when the master gets the collar out, because they are smart enough to understand the collar means they get to bird hunt with the boss. I highly recommend Dan Thomasons Sure Thing Kennel in Montana or Holly's Tartana Kennel out west also.
You can find both their operations on the Net.
Pine Creek/Dave
 
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