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Commissioners Add 45 Streams to Wild Trout List



WILKES-BARRE, Pa. (May 5) – During its quarterly business meeting held here today, the Pennsylvania Fish and Boat Commission (PFBC) added 45 new waters to its list of wild trout streams; approved a lease of its Somerset Lake property; approved a plan to reestablish the fishery at Huntingdon County’s Lake Perez; and removed several species from the state’s Threatened Species list.



The PFBC held its meeting yesterday and today at the Woodlands Inn in Wilkes-Barre.



At today’s formal meeting, Commissioners approved adding the wild trout listings, which include waters in Cameron, Carbon, Centre, Clarion, Clearfield, Clinton, Fayette, Forest, Huntingdon, Indiana, Jefferson, Lancaster, Luzerne, Lycoming, Monroe, Northampton, Somerset, Sullivan, Union and York counties. The list can be found on the PFBC website.



Commissioners also approved a 25-year agreement with Somerset County to lease the PFBC’s Somerset Lake property in order to enhance the property’s public recreational use and operation. The lease requires the county to be responsible for routine maintenance of the leased property, excluding the dam area and the PFBC’s Southwest Regional Office. Also, the county must seek PFBC approval before making any new recreational improvements.



In Huntingdon County, Commissioners approved a plan to reestablish the fishery at Lake Perez in Barree Township. The lake, owned by the Pennsylvania State University, was drained in 2009 in order to rebuild the dam. Construction was completed in summer 2014 and the lake has been refilled. Under the regulations adopted today, anglers will be allowed to harvest trout but will be restricted to catch and release rules for all other species until the fishery is reestablished. The change will take effect upon publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.



Also today, Commissioners adopted a final rulemaking order to remove the Bluebreast darter, Gilt darter, Spotted darter and Tippecanoe darter from the state’s list of threatened species. The change will take effect upon publication in the Pennsylvania Bulletin.



In other action today:
•Commissioners added one stream section in Carbon County to the list of Class A wild trout streams. The list can be found on the PFBC website.
•Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would eliminate the restriction for personal watercraft (PWC) to tow no more than one skier. The total number of persons being towed, in addition to the operator, observer and any other passengers, may not exceed the maximum passenger capacity of the boat.
•In Beaver County, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would limit boats on Little Beaver Creek to slow, no wake speed from the mouth upstream to the state line. If adopted on final rulemaking, the amendments will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.
•In Bucks County, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would limit boats on Neshaminy Creek to slow, no wake speed on the entire creek from its headwaters to its confluence with the Delaware River. If adopted on final rulemaking, the amendment will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.
•In Cumberland County, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would eliminate the water skiing zone on the Conodoguinet Creek in the vicinity of the Power Company Dam at Cave Hill. If adopted on final rulemaking, the amendment will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.
•In Delaware County, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would limit boats on Darby Creek to slow, no wake speed on the entire creek from its headwaters to its confluence with the Delaware River. If adopted on final rulemaking, the amendment will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.
•In Lehigh County, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which would allow water skiing on the Lehigh River at the Allentown Pool, between the Tilghman Street Bridge and the Hamilton Street Dam in Allentown. If adopted on final rulemaking, the amendment will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2016.

Also, Commissioners approved the publication of a notice of proposed rulemaking which amends striped bass regulations in the Delaware River and Delaware Estuary. The changes went into effect on March 1 on a temporary basis in order to meet requirements of the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (ASMFC) to reduce fishing mortality rates.



Beginning March 1, the creel limit for striped bass in the Estuary – defined as the Pennsylvania/Delaware state line upstream to the Calhoun Street Bridge – was reduced to one fish from January 1 through March 31 and from June 1 through December 31. Fish must be at least 28 inches. For the remaining two months, from April 1 through May 31, the slot length limit was changed to 21-25 inches. During this two-month period, the creel limit will remain at two fish per day.



In the Delaware River upstream of the Estuary – defined as upstream from the Calhoun Street Bridge – the creel limit for striped bass was reduced from two fish to one. The river is open year-round with a minimum size of 28 inches.



Public comments on the proposed rulemaking orders will be accepted for 30 days after the notices are published in the Pennsylvania Bulletin. Comments can be submitted to the PFBC through its website at: http://fishandboat.com/reg398.htm.



A complete copy of the meeting schedule and the full agenda for the meeting can be found on the Commission’s web site at www.fishandboat.com/minutes.htm. For more information about fishing and boating in Pennsylvania, please visit our website at www.fishandboat.com.
 

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I have a feeling that the Fish Commission doesn't know about half the wild trout streams out there. There are a bunch in Wayne and Pike that aren't listed as class A streams.
 

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Rusty Dog said:
I have a feeling that the Fish Commission doesn't know about half the wild trout streams out there. There are a bunch in Wayne and Pike that aren't listed as class A streams.
It's a matter of surveying the streams to confirm Class A criteria. It's a small crew there's only so many streams they can survey in a relatively small window of time each summer. They typically survey in July & August too see if they can find YOY in the middle of summer. They do take angler input in reporting new stream sections that may possibly meet Class A and should be scheduled for a survey. If you know of a stream or streams that you strongly think could meet Class A criteria you should contact your the Northeast region fisheries manager and let he or she know. Keep at it too and if you can get other anglers that know the stream to support you even better.
 

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What happen after a stream is listed as class A? Does the fish commission monitor them for over fishing and pollution and such?
 

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The Fish Commission has very little money. Labeling streams Class A removes many of them from the stocking list and that saves money. There is no way with their limited resources to monitor the wild streams.
 

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RyanR said:
Rusty Dog said:
I have a feeling that the Fish Commission doesn't know about half the wild trout streams out there. There are a bunch in Wayne and Pike that aren't listed as class A streams.
It's a matter of surveying the streams to confirm Class A criteria. It's a small crew there's only so many streams they can survey in a relatively small window of time each summer. They typically survey in July & August too see if they can find YOY in the middle of summer. They do take angler input in reporting new stream sections that may possibly meet Class A and should be scheduled for a survey. If you know of a stream or streams that you strongly think could meet Class A criteria you should contact your the Northeast region fisheries manager and let he or she know. Keep at it too and if you can get other anglers that know the stream to support you even better.
Or better yet Rusty Dog just shoot me a PM with the stream names and I'll inventory them for you and let you know if they're actually class A ;-)
 

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A class A stream does receive certain protections that other creeks may not so there is some benifit. The trade off is that the stream name will be listed on the Class A list for all to see so it will no longer be your secret fishin hole. Me personally.......I keep them to myself unless I start to see signs of trouble for the watershed.
 

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I have fished some of these "class A" streams and have failed to catch anything or even see a fish. Seems like the list they put out is hit or miss as far as good fishing gos.
 

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Mostly, a Class A designation (and subsequently High Quality or Exceptional Value designations) helps protect a stream against water quality degradation and also from stocking directly over the designated Class A section. In some cases, the PFBC may look to further protect a Class A section with stricter creel or tackle regulations. For me, designating a stream Class A, certainly a stream in more populated and accessible areas, can be important in helping to legally protect that stream from various water quality degredations and secondarily from unnecessary stocking over a thriving wild population.
 

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Wild Trout 24/7 said:
I have fished some of these "class A" streams and have failed to catch anything or even see a fish. Seems like the list they put out is hit or miss as far as good fishing gos.
My favorite stream in the state, which is LOADED with trout, sometimes coughs up stinkers and even zeros. If it was your first time there one probably would never go back. But if it is 'right' then WOW....a day you'll never forget. I've learned a lot over the years and the one thing I've learned more than any is that every stream has its 'wheel house' were every trout in the stream is out feeding aggressively. They also have conditions were you wouldn't think a single trout is alive in the water. What I can say is that 95% of the streams on that list hold a LOT of trout. I usually give a stream that looks good several chances under different conditions before I mail it in. It's paid off a lot over the years.
 

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Trout 2003 said:
Wild Trout 24/7 said:
I have fished some of these "class A" streams and have failed to catch anything or even see a fish. Seems like the list they put out is hit or miss as far as good fishing gos.



My favorite stream in the state, which is LOADED with trout, sometimes coughs up stinkers and even zeros. If it was your first time there one probably would never go back. But if it is 'right' then WOW....a day you'll never forget. I've learned a lot over the years and the one thing I've learned more than any is that every stream has its 'wheel house' were every trout in the stream is out feeding aggressively. They also have conditions were you wouldn't think a single trout is alive in the water. What I can say is that 95% of the streams on that list hold a LOT of trout. I usually give a stream that looks good several chances under different conditions before I mail it in. It's paid off a lot over the years.

 

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Trout is spot on, I fish several class A streams that are only productive when the water is very high and off colored. If you fish it say the middle of summer its like there are no fish there, Dont even see them.

Ive also fished some that seem like there are no trout for a mile, Then all of a sudden its like there are fish everywhere. I do believe some class A streams havent been checked in a long time and are maybe not what they once were, But for the most part class A streams hold lots of fish.
 
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