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Discussion Starter #1
I am going on an out of state DIY whitetail hunt in mid-November. I'm going to be camping in the bed of my truck.

I don't have a generator to run anything electric and was wondering if anyone has any kind of heat source where carbon monoxide is not an issue? My sleeping setup is pretty warm, so I don't need much heat, depending on what the weather is at the time. Just kind surfing for ideas right now.
I may even cook on the tailgate before bed and just run the Coleman stove enough to warm things up inside and then get all tucked in. Any suggestions appreciated.
 

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This is my setup, and I use a Coleman Black-Cat catalytic heater in there. I leave some vents open, but still turn it off before I crash. Heats it up nicely in there, and with the electric igniter it fires up quickly in the morning.

 

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I looked at those truck bed tents. But I picked up this cap instead in case I drove into town for something I wouldn't have to tear it down.

I have one of those catalytic heaters too.
I have two carpets laid in the bed of my truck to get off the metal. Then I have a 6 inch piece of foam for a mattress. Then I have a full tanned caribou hide that I'll lay on top of the foam mattress. My mummy bag goes on top of the caribou hide and I have another sleeping bag that I unzip and use as a blanket if it gets colder. I'll most likely be good to go but just want to be prepared if we'd get some really cold weather.
When I was in Alaska, we'd light the stove to warm things up a bit in the am before getting out of our bags. Same as in the evening, cook dinner in the tent and get in your bag while it was still warm after the stove was shut off. I plan to do the same on this trip. You just never know what kind of cold snap you'll get at that time of year.
 

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Sounds like you should be warm enough, as is!


If I wasn't in Germany I'd have bought a cap instead too, and didn't think of it before shipping the truck here. They're possible to find here (not easily), but about triple the price as back home.

I pretty much only use the tent for one or two night hunts, so it's not a problem. But if I do stay longer and need to drop it occasionally I can have it down and stowed in about 10 minutes, and I've got setting it back up down to about 20 minutes.
 

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It looks like you have enough equipment for at least 20 degrees. I'm a backpacker with enough gear for 0 degrees but for extra warmth we place boiling water in a 32 oz Nalgene bottle placed in a heavy sock. It will stay warm for about 8 hrs and I'm pretty toasty with it in my down bag plus you don't have frozen water in the AM. There are precautions so you need to read up on it. Most of my camping is in winter in extreme conditions and I've been using this method for years
Be safe Happy camping
 

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Discussion Starter #8
BCozhunter said:
Sounds like you should be warm enough, as is!
I hope that's the case.

I subscribe to the theory of: "I'd rather have it and not need it, than need it and not have it."
 

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Can buy a very small generator at Harbor Freight for around $110. that could run a small elect heater all night
 

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When I was in Germany out on exercises, no tent, would strip down to the undies, put clothes and boots inside the mummy bag and stayed warm all night. Nothing like warm body and warm clothes in the morning. Too many clothes on will cause you to sweat. Enjoy.
 

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I was gonna post but found thus instead. I was thinking of putting that bubble wrap silver insulation on the roof of my cap to help with the condensation , or cutting a trailer vent that you can close, besides cracking the windows, my approach to heating it up was to run a little propane heater for a little but, shut it off, and light it in the am to heat it up a bit as I wake up. I have a tall cap so I was gonna make a raised bed so I can put storage underneath (totes ) or whatnot. I already put an aluminum bar across the top of cap with hooks so I can just hook the grommets of a tarp to make an awning out the back. Just put a couple poles and guide lines up..
 

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Done the truck tent thing. Works. works best if you are walking from camp. But if you are driving - the tent comes down each morning in the dark, and is reassembled each evening in the dark.

Done the tent thin in warm weather but mostly winter late fall where I have had several inches of snow, high wings, ice, sleet and tons of rain.


I actually prefer just sleeping in back of the truck under the tunno cover.

Find a foam pad to use as cushion and to get off the bed. Mine is 24" wide and i double up 2" thick foam, with another small piece I position under my hips.

I specifically bought one of the Milspec triple layer sleep systems (prior to that I just stacked commercial bags).

Foam down, sleep bag down, flashlight, clothes for the morning prepared and placed in a wet weather bag or other location. Crawl in and flip the cover down and lock one side (high wind and just a bit of security)

I also have a poly blanket that I drape over my chest and upper body. Pervents that sleeping bag battle all night and actually males this system really comfortable.

The small area is warmed by body heat.

If water vapor is a concern, prop one corner of the cover up - and I do that from time to time.

I have camped in sub zero weather, monsoonal rains, ice storms, snow (worst part is getting snow in the face when you didn't know it snowed...) Never cold, or a bad nights sleep.

In COLD weather I sleep in a pair of those flannel or poly sleep pants, a sweat shirt, and might even wear a sock cap if really cold. Might even add sock, but usually don't.

in the coldest weather I wear my camp Muck shoes and or a regular pair of rubber soled slippers, and do camp life without sock for the most part. Comfortably.

I usually skip the fire. A lantern and stove round out the normal stuff. I cook in a old skillet and mostly wipe rather than wash (opting for quick fast food - eggs, meat, and less for the fillers that stick or crate a mess).

To each his own.

I usually have a mid sized cooler. If very cold a gallon of water is stored inside to prevent freezing at. Keeps the food stuff cold, but unfroze as well. Mostly, if the lid is off while in camp at night, temps keep Everything cool all day long if the lid is left on all day. I will even take a 1/2 Gallon milk jug and allow it to freeze at night if warm weather is expected.

Got to think ahead and use the weather.

Now, if at all possible, I use a poly trap and create a rain fly at the back of the truck enough to cover half the truck bed (or all of it if rainy). Allows opening of the cover and dressing in the dry.

I now do the same thing with the truck tent if using that. The rain fly totally separate from the truck in every aspect.

When sleeping in back of the truck, i can be up, dressed and packed away - on the road in 20 minutes. Minimum tear down - and for a few years I took a small two man tent and used it for storage during the day (yard sale $10).

Like all things plan ahead - test and adapt.

Until recently, I camped from bow season all the way through flintlock season - all weather all conditions... within reason. And sometimes, reason went out the door.

End of the day - camping is and always will be what you make of it. Expect cold and wet in the winter -plan to live in it for short periods. Know where the local laundromat is if dryers are needed (once in 10 years).

Expect dark
Expect wet
Expect cold

Expect all of it as you go to bed
Expect all of it when you wake and have to poke your nose and hinney out to get dressed.

All in what you make it and what is tolerable to each of us - we're all different.
 

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Next morning




On another trip...

Morning coffee after a stormy night




The tent ready for folding for the day as the coffee prepares (snowed 4" that night) ...




Thought I had back of truck pictures, and sure I posted them before on here - can't find them now.
 

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Power inverter plugged into a lighter outlet, and a small ceramic heater, will be enough to take the chill off. Plus no risk of CO poisoning.

Indoor/Outdoor carpeting on the floor for insulation.

Folding cot to get you up off the floor.

I lived near a guy who used to camp out of his truck on archery hunts. he had the bed tricked out like a camper with night stand, cots, table, lights, you name it. I always wanted to try it but never got around to it.
 

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Newer inverters have buzzer alarms that tell you when the vehicle battery is getting down to the point that you need to start the engine and recharge the battery. That and an auxiliary battery. There are an amazing selection of 12 volt appliances for sale too. A decade back target stores had 12 volt blenders, coffee pots, even a toaster. and at very reasonable prices. Harbor freight sold a small light duty 12 volt "defroster" heater/fan that wasn't much, but could help take the chill out of the air. The metal roof on the camper shell is the real heat loss. You could try insulating the inside, or just throw an old blanket and tarp over top to insulate from the outside. I spent a frosty weekend camped with an aluminum truck shell. Much warmer when we put some straw and a tarp over the top to insulate the shell.
 
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