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Discussion Starter #1
When I clean the barrrel of my Flinter I use the hot water and soap method and this requires me to remove the barrel from the stock. Not a problem beause the barrel is secured with wedges. What do people do with flinters that have the barrel secured with pins rather than wedges? It appears to me that these pinned barrrels are not easy to take out of the stock and the constant dismounting would ruin the stock and lead to placing the barrel lugs in differnt places.
 

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Brad Emig suggested that I do NOT remove the pins holding my PA Mountain Rifle stock/bbl he built.. Put a wooden tooth pic in touch hole, fill bbl with hot/soapy water and flush. He put a layer of vasoline or some other protectant where bbl joins stock so per Brad...no need to remove unless gun was submerged in saltwater or sumpin and a total dismantling required.. Just passing on what Brad suggests for what its worth. He knows a tad more than me so i follow his directions to a T!!
 

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I use a piece of clear surgical tube. Remove lock assy, Take the touch hole liner out, screw in the surgical tube. Place other end of tube in a bucket of hot soapy water. I use a 2.5 inch round cleaning patch soaked in the soapy water and inserted into the barrel with cleaning jag attached to ram rod. as you push the rod down the barrel you will notice the bubbles in the bucket, leave the tube submerged and pull the ram rod out but not completely. This will draw the hot soapy water into the barrel. push rod back in , pull rod back out, etc. This will clean the barrel.
 

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Brad told me the same thing that Loggy said. If you look at TVM's site they have an article on cleaning flinters. Brad also said that you should also never take the touch hole liner out. He said that you will get more pressure with it in and some you just can't take out except with an ezout
 

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Sounds good but you aint taking the touch hole liner out of my Colerain barrel!! Its there for the long haul unless you wanna almost drill out & retap it!! lol
 

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The touch hole in my Douglas XX has a removal liner, screws out with a alan wrench, which I remove.
 

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Both of my guns are pinned and I remove the barrel from the stock all the time, I use a small punch and hammer to remove the pins.Just take care setting the barrel back in the stock so you don't damage the wood. This has worked fine for me for years.
 

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When I install my touch hole liners, they are there to stay as well. I never remove my barrels either. Hot soapy water and lots of patches. If you don't feel that's getting it clean enough for you, go to The Log Cabin Shop

E-Z CLEAN FLINTLOCK GUN CLEANER $19.95 (+Ohio Sales Tax) EA


263304!

Allows quick, complete barrel cleaning on all flintlock guns. Simply remove the lock, clamp unit over touch hole and place the weighted tube in a container of solvent. Swabbing the bore causes the solvent to be pumped into the barrel and expelled on the down stroke. Light weight, easy to carry, fits any barrel up to 1-1/8 across the flats.

This might be what you want.
 

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When I build a gun with the barrel pinned to the stock or where an under rib or forestock as on an underhammer is pinned to the barrel, I treat the enclosed areas of the metal with a long-term rust preventative compound that also seals to the wood if it's not bedded. The lock should be fit tightly to the barrel, that joint can also be easily sealed. I use long-term rust preventative & lubricant on the lock internals so it need not be removed for routine cleaning as the mortise will loosen resulting in a floppy lock and having a floppy lock is like having a limp ... well, you get the idea.

Plug the vent/nipple and put the bore on to soak for a period of time then dump the bore out. Use a padded vise or some such device to hold the gun with the muzzle and vent/nipple pointed down. Clean with a well saturated patch allowing the excess water to blow out the vent/nipple hole, with it pointed down, rarely will anything get wet other than the exterior of the lock around the pan, frizzen and hammer; those areas that need to be wiped down anyway. If you want an added layer of protection, cover the stock around the muzzle and lock with press and stick plastic wrap (I forget the brand name but it's in the grocery store with the other plastic food wraps and storage bags).
 

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In a a nut shell it wasput to me this way----there is so much (thickness) in a barrel it isnt necessary to worry about rust or anything else hurting the metal so not to worry about removing the pins. I had Don put wedges in my 44" barrel and I guess after a few years I might take them out to actually take a gander this spring. I will report back my findings as to if it necessary or not to do so. My Lyman I always di so but not with this one.
 

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Taking a barrel out or leaving it in is a matter of preferance(no right or wrong) if the gun is built right and care is taken removing the barrel won't hurt a thing.
All that said I leave mine in to clean.

Mark KW You must be using some soft wood. My locks have ben out of their mortice. 1000s of times they are as tight as the day they were inlett.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks to all for the great responses. I like the idea of putting extra rust preventative on the metal where it joins the barrel and then sealing the wood in the channel. I dont want to take the barrel out for cleaning on this particular rifle.
 

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long hunter said:
Taking a barrel out or leaving it in is a matter of preferance(no right or wrong) if the gun is built right and care is taken removing the barrel won't hurt a thing.
All that said I leave mine in to clean.

Mark KW You must be using some soft wood. My locks have ben out of their mortice. 1000s of times they are as tight as the day they were inlett.
Doesn't matter how hard the wood is, the wood fibers in mortises and pin holes will get crushed/displaced or otherwise damaged and thing will loosen-up over time. When the gun is built right, there's no need to disassemble it for cleaning. I had a .62 I built for myself that I hunted with and shot year-round for a little over two years and when I pulled it apart to let its new owner have a look-see, it was just as clean and pretty on the inside as the day I put it together.

From a business standpoint, I suppose I should agree with you though because repair work is always welcome in my shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Well that's an interesting comment and it maps to my orginal question. Frankly, I don't understand your comment relative to a gun being built right effecting the need for cleaning. How does a buit right gun stop it from getting fouled and needing a good scrubbing?
 

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If the mortice is the same size as the lock plate how are the fibers being crushed? Unless someone is trying to put it in crooked If care is taken there should be virtualy no wear.

I have seen 200+ year old guns with tight lock to mortice fit that were obvously being taken apart on a regular basis by evidence of lock screw head being worn from the turn screw.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Good point Long Hunter. If the stock is inlet correctly - what fibers would be getting crushed? Copressed slightly - perhaps at a maximum. But crushed?
 

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Mark Kw said:
long hunter said:
Taking a barrel out or leaving it in is a matter of preferance(no right or wrong) if the gun is built right and care is taken removing the barrel won't hurt a thing.
All that said I leave mine in to clean.

Mark KW You must be using some soft wood. My locks have ben out of their mortice. 1000s of times they are as tight as the day they were inlett.
Doesn't matter how hard the wood is, the wood fibers in mortises and pin holes will get crushed/displaced or otherwise damaged and thing will loosen-up over time. When the gun is built right, there's no need to disassemble it for cleaning. I had a .62 I built for myself that I hunted with and shot year-round for a little over two years and when I pulled it apart to let its new owner have a look-see, it was just as clean and pretty on the inside as the day I put it together.

From a business standpoint, I suppose I should agree with you though because repair work is always welcome in my shop.
Like what has already been said “Taking a barrel out or leaving it in is a matter of preferance(no right or wrong)” I agree.

As for the lock….. I feel it should be removed. Just my opinion

I have two rifles that have 1000’s of shots on both of them. One was made in 1978 and one was made in 1986. Both of these rifles had the locks removed “EVERY” time they where shot and cleaned. You tell me if the lock mortise is no longer tight!?

Reading Rifle 62 cal built 1986


Va Rifle 50 cal built 1978



Chris Laubach
 

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I must say it is very important to take the lock out to clean it properly as well as oil the components and spring inside...I spent $125 on my Delux Siler Lock----you bet I dont want to have any rust on the inside of that lock!! Moisture will get in tere---to function properly a lock must be maintained and oiled. I hope GBJR chimes in on the historiical significance and importance of our military keeping the lock in "propoer working order". I know there is plenty of documentation supporting this to the beginning of flintlock invention---just dont have it on hand.
 

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Forget I said anything ... what could I possibly know after 29 years of fixing buggered up guns? Just think about one thing, among the several that came through my shop last year for repairs, roughly half were the result of "oopse" including a very nice one that suffered a rather nasty split during its first cleaning because the owner's punch slipped off a pin. I only offered a suggestion, it's your gun, do as you please.

Jimsdad,

Over two years of shooting my .62 flinter at least once per week plus hunting, bottom of the barrel and inside the lock looked the same as the day I put it together. If fouling & water can't get in, it can't cause any problems.
 
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