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Discussion Starter #1
Just wanted to share this with ya.Not sure about who made it yet or what battle,but supposedly it was a surrendered gun.I will have it for myself soon and can take more detailed pics.Any information that can be told just from looking at it would be nice though.I love these things and it really looks like it's in great condition thus far. I hope you enjoy the pics.













 

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Re: Civil War flinter

Any markings, stamps on the barrel or anywhere on gun?
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

Well I feel stupid now. I assumed it was a flint,never looked farther than what I could see there up above the fireplace.No other info at this time.I will have all the information soon though on it.
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

It looks almost like the one I have thats been handed down through the family,,mine is a Model 1855 U.S. Percussion Rifle-Musket
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

It looks alot like a Navy Arms replica from the 1970's. I sure hope its not! Hope you have the real deal. Its for sure a 3 band military configuration, the bayonet looks real. Keep us posted !
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

Looks like a fine piece.
When it is finally in your hands, make sure it does not have an old charge and ball hidden away at the breech. Use the ramrod as your measuring device along the outside of the barrel to the breech. Then, drop the ramrod down the barrel. The ramrod must come to the same position inside as outside. If it is clean and empty, the ramrod should bounce off the face of the breech plug with an obvious metal to metal sound.

Good luck with it.
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

Looking better at the pictures show a Brit crown on the left of the lock and a stamping to the right side by the deer hoof. Would the crown make it Enfield?
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

1853 Enfield pattern English rifled musket. Used on both sidews as I recall. There were other armories that made them with interchangeable parts, even in India for Brit colonial use. So it wasn't necessarily made at the Enfield works, unless it actually says so.

many Enfield's had a progressive rifling. ie grooves deeper at the breech than at the muzzle. After the civil war, many Enfields were converted to cartridge guns by using the Snider system. Some colonial manufacturered Enfield pattern guns were 24 ga smooth bore.

The standard list of charges from the Brit War Dept for the 1853 Enfield ranged from 56 grains of powder to 65 grains of powder under patched round ball or mostly minnie balls running from 450 grains to 520 grain.

It is only Enfield if so stamped on the lock. It could be stamped with another name like Barnett or one of the other firms that made them to the Enfield pattern.

There will be markings like the crown, crossed sabers, etc. it may even have unit markings, which could greatly increase it's worth.

The Parker Hale company made exact replicas until just recently, parts interchanged with originals. I heard that they stopped production, but I haven't verified that. There were other replicas of Enfield from other countries, particularly Italy. If it is an Italian repro, it will have Italian proof marks usually a "PN" as well as a date code in one or two letters (ie "BG") (required by Italian law since around 1951)

If an original it may also have both Brit and US or CSA inspector's cartouches.

There are some web sites with copies of the various markings and codes so you can compare. (Try the Enfield forum at the British Militaria forums at http://britishmilitariaforums.yuku.com/forums/4/British-Flint-and-Percussion-Arms)
 

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Discussion Starter #14

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Re: Civil War flinter

At the British Militaria forum, there are posters from England who have written books about 19th century Brit issue firearms. Some of those guys can "decipher" the barrel stampings right off.
 

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Re: Civil War flinter

Here's more info on what the discharge certificate is. This was in the Harrisburg Patriot News a little while back. I kept a picture of it because I have one of these certificates for one of my relatives too.

 

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Re: Civil War flinter

wow that's pritty cool. I know that at the time my great-great-great grandfather was a teacher and had the money to pay someone else to take his spot in the draft. My family has the documentation for it. I know it is a way out but still a part of history. Also in i have a hat that was worn by a relative. He was from Centre county and at camp curtin at the time. The hat is in good shape for the age and from what my grandfather told me in his youth they had 5 complete uniforms complete with springfields. One day his mom had a bug up her butt and wanted to clean house. To make a long story short my pap snatched the hat before it got burned and that is all that is left
 
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