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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are some pictures of the trees I have questions about. The first 4 are Chinese that have been planted for about 3 years now. One got run over by the mower one evening when I pushed it past dark too much. The tree tied to the metal post was planted a year before so it is 4 years and was looking like a good tree but I recently cut all the branches off but one which I plan on removing today.

The question I have is should I put tubes on these smaller ones? should I prune them first or just let them go the way they are?









These next 4 are dunstant that I planted last spring.



I did cut this one off, unlike the first dunstan pictured. Should I top the other three?



 

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Are you trying to get more of a bush form, or what is the strategy behind cutting them back? I am not a chestnut expert, but I don't know that chestnuts need or benefit much from pruning (like a fruit tree might).

That first dunstan pictured looks great to me, but I might be missing your objective.
 

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I don't really want a bush. My hope is for a good healthy tree that gives nuts sooner instead of later. I also want to be able to mow around them so I wanted the limbs to be high enough for that.

ng270 you are right. I am treating them like fruit trees.
 

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Trapping4fun said:
I don't really want a bush. My hope is for a good healthy tree that gives nuts sooner instead of later. I also want to be able to mow around them so I wanted the limbs to be high enough for that.

ng270 you are right. I am treating them like fruit trees.
very nice.

In theory, your treatment should give you the goals for which you have described. Chinese will still want to branch low because their natural habit is multi-trunk,...just keep forcing to a central leader over time. I have seen many Chinese in a forest setting grow as a single trunk. You can see they don't like it but they had to in order to fight for sun.

Prune when dormant,...early March works for me WAY up north. If you really don't want any limbs below 5', consider placing a 5' tube on them inside the cages,...see how your partially tubed Dunstan's have zero lower limbs.

Also, more sun = earlier to produce flowers,..usually.
 
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