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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has this ever happened to anyone else? My cousin and i were hunting a section of state forrest in 4D the last saturday of deer season this year and we were confronted by a DCNR official once we reached our vehichle. The man asked us if we had any luck and engaged in some small talk with us at first before asking to see our cid numbers and photo id cards. This was no shock to me as i am used to running into fish commission while fishing in my boat and they always do the same thing. After he checked out our info, what i thought was kind of weird, is that the guy wrote down the serial numbers from both of our guns before he would allow us to leave. Im kind of just wondering if this is some new protocol that these guys are practicing or what? Has this ever happened to anyone else or could anyone give me some info as to why he did this? thanks...
 

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I think he would have had to give me a real good reason to write down a serial number of my gun.I'll have to follow this thread to see what the legal beagles have to say about this.
 

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Some of the DCNR cops are trying to justify their jobs to keep them. They have caused problems for police departments that cover some of the same ground that they patrol. I know this for a fact and that is all I can say on that matter. Some have been down right rude with the police officers and demanding, which got them no where except in hot water with their bosses.
 

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skube said:
I think he would have had to give me a real good reason to write down a serial number of my gun.I'll have to follow this thread to see what the legal beagles have to say about this.

+1
 

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It will be interesting to hear from the WCO's on here about that, if they do it, and why, and what they do with the numbers after they get them.
 

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Getting the serial numbers from any guns in the area can be important sometimes. Anytime there is a hunter related shooting incident whether it is a person, property or wildlife that has been shot. If we know the incident just recently occurred and the subjects took off we will get as many officers as possible around the area where we expect hunters will come out as they leave the area. Since we frequently haven’t had an opportunity to collect any evidence at the scene yet we want all names, where they were checked and information, such as caliber and serial numbers, from their firearms so we can either rule them out or establish them as a suspect. Sometimes we do have an officer on scene and they have found casings and know the caliber of the firearm so the canvassing officers collect all information on firearms of that caliber or gauge. If need be we can then go back to them later, question them in more depth or even get a warrant for their gun so it can be matched to any recovered evidence.

Of course most people aren’t the guilty person so we might never have any need to contact them about the incident later and they are then just left wondering why the officer checked them and their firearm. We frequently don’t even tell them what we are investigating so we can monitor their body language while we are checking them. That in its self can often lead us to the correct suspects.

I suspect there was something going on in the area or the officer probably wouldn’t have been checking serial numbers.

Dick Bodenhorn
 

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R. S. B. said:
Of course most people aren’t the guilty person so we might never have any need to contact them about the incident later and they are then just left wondering why the officer checked them and their firearm. We frequently don’t even tell them what we are investigating so we can monitor their body language while we are checking them. That in its self can often lead us to the correct suspects.

I suspect there was something going on in the area or the officer probably wouldn’t have been checking serial numbers.

Dick Bodenhorn
So unless something has happened there is no reason for a Officer to be writing down any serial numbers on a routine basis. If he does, is he overstepping his bounds?
The reason I ask is lots of us have legacy weapons, or acquired them before the transfer requirements that they go through a database went into effect. We like having our old guns that nobody knows about, because we don't trust this (or some, any) Government not to come and tax us yearly for each gun, telling us how many we can have, or try to take them away.
That is a concern.
 

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NCIC check for stolen firearms is a common occurence and is well within the officer's duties and responsibilities. There is no law enforcement database for long guns in PA. There IS a database of ownership for handguns which goes back into the late 1800's. For NCIC, it is a query-only program, no owner information is required or entered. Query goes off serial number; make and model are optional. If there is a negative-stolen response, most officers only put down in their report that the weapon was checked through NCIC with negative results. If there is any report at all. No different that an officer checking your license plate, driver's license status, or your CID number on your license. There is no seizure involved here, it's a non-obtrusive investigatory procedure.
 

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i'm a tellin ya theres a conspiracy going on--big brother thing.i went to my mail box this summer and low and behold there was a bar code sticker on the inside of the door,i asked my mailman about it and he was told he had to put them on 'new policy-federal'--we'll of course i tore mine off,"i don't need no stinkin sticker on my mail box from the 'federalalies'
 

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There is no "reason" needed for checking your registration plate since it is displayed in the open.

A check of your driver's license can only be done when an officer stops you while driving.

The check of a firearms serial number, unless it is directly related to an investigation or detention is NOT something that should be done. There is no basis for a police officer or WCO to run the serial number. Are they going to run the serial number of your watch, cell phone or anything else in your vehicle?
 

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WCO's are not going to run a serial number unless he is involved in an investigation as RSB stated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks for all the feedback so far guys. Just makes me kind of nervous because i have no idea why he took our numbers. I was kind of wondering if this was some new practice that they were doing to figure out which citizens have guns at home. Ive heard of a new gun tax rumor and i really dont feel like paying a tax for each gun i own. If thats the case i'll sell the ones they know i have and keep the ones they dont know about.
 

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Why did'nt you just ask the Officer?
 

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Not this fellow's serial number, no way no how. If he needs to arrest me so be it. Sign of things to come??

Muab Dib
 

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So if an Officer is investigating a hunting related shooting incident in the area, are you saying you would refuse to provide your serial number upon request of that Officer?
 

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So if an Officer is investigating a hunting related shooting incident in the are are you saying you would refuse to provide your serial number upon request of that Officer?
Huh?
 
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