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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question for you F-150 owners. My first f150 was an '02. I run tire chains a lot when I'm up at my camp in winter. On my '02 I had no issues. But my second F-150 was on '07 and they started doing those outward mounted shocks on them. When I ran chains, they would slap the shocks and make an annoying loud slapping noise.
I just got a '14 F-150 and it has the outward mounted shocks also. What kind of chains do you guys run that don't slap the shocks??? I got mine from tire chains.com. Looking to get a better set that doesn't slap.
 

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I run them almost every day on my work truck, which is a 2010 F150. I have a set of v bars right now that I got from tirechains.com..........they have the cams to tighten them up.......after using the cams, I will never buy a set without the cams on them. tighten them once and you are good to go....

I had to cut a crosslink off of the chains, and trim the ends accordingly to get rid of any slapping I had. I left three link on after the last cross link. I usually hook the inside into the second link, and hook the outside as tight as I can get it. Then you flip all of the cams and you are good to go.

Cutting that cross link and shortening the side chains got rid of any slapping issues that I had
 

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Get a set of rims and tires and put the chains on the tires while they are deflated and then inflate the tires.
Then keep the tires with the chains in a shed somewhere.
I know this don't solve your problem but if you have to use chains to get into your camp you are probably better off to just stay home!

I think that chains gives people with four wheel drives a over confidence and sooner or later you might end up driving off the road and then the tow will cost double, because you will get stuck someplace where the tow truck driver doesn't want to take his tow truck and he might charge you double to get you out!

I would be more worried that I might damage the strut and that would be pretty expensive to replace.
 

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Trail said:
Get a set of rims and tires and put the chains on the tires while they are deflated and then inflate the tires.
Then keep the tires with the chains in a shed somewhere.
I know this don't solve your problem but if you have to use chains to get into your camp you are probably better off to just stay home!

I think that chains gives people with four wheel drives a over confidence and sooner or later you might end up driving off the road and then the tow will cost double, because you will get stuck someplace where the tow truck driver doesn't want to take his tow truck and he might charge you double to get you out!

I would be more worried that I might damage the strut and that would be pretty expensive to replace.
I can have a set of chain on and off in 5 or 10 minutes tops, it isn't a big deal and they are not difficult to put on........

You need tthem this time of year to travel unplowed forestry roads and such, they arent really bad roads just too much snow clogging up tire treads so chains give you plenty of traction.....
 

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Trail said:
I think that chains gives people with four wheel drives a over confidence and sooner or later you might end up driving off the road and then the tow will cost double, because you will get stuck someplace where the tow truck driver doesn't want to take his tow truck and he might charge you double to get you out!
I've been stuck places well beyond the reach of a tow truck, without the use of chains. I've also never hired a tow truck driver to recover my vehicle from such places. It turns out that some people are inclined to venture off improved and/or maintained roadways, whether for work or play.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Trail said:
Get a set of rims and tires and put the chains on the tires while they are deflated and then inflate the tires.
Then keep the tires with the chains in a shed somewhere.
I know this don't solve your problem but if you have to use chains to get into your camp you are probably better off to just stay home!

I think that chains gives people with four wheel drives a over confidence and sooner or later you might end up driving off the road and then the tow will cost double, because you will get stuck someplace where the tow truck driver doesn't want to take his tow truck and he might charge you double to get you out!

I would be more worried that I might damage the strut and that would be pretty expensive to replace.
I don't need chains to get into my camp. They are for driving back roads in FL and beaver trapping season.
Been driving with chains for about 20 years and have never been stuck where I couldn't get out.
I appreciate your suggestion, but think I'll stick with putting the chains on and off. Pretty easy to jack it up and put them on.
 

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kudu58 said:
Trail said:
Get a set of rims and tires and put the chains on the tires while they are deflated and then inflate the tires.
Then keep the tires with the chains in a shed somewhere.
I know this don't solve your problem but if you have to use chains to get into your camp you are probably better off to just stay home!

I think that chains gives people with four wheel drives a over confidence and sooner or later you might end up driving off the road and then the tow will cost double, because you will get stuck someplace where the tow truck driver doesn't want to take his tow truck and he might charge you double to get you out!

I would be more worried that I might damage the strut and that would be pretty expensive to replace.
I don't need chains to get into my camp. They are for driving back roads in FL and beaver trapping season.
Been driving with chains for about 20 years and have never been stuck where I couldn't get out.
I appreciate your suggestion, but think I'll stick with putting the chains on and off. Pretty easy to jack it up and put them on.
I don't even jack it up.

Just lay the chains out flat and untangle them, then drape a chain over each tire so that the first cross link is just under the front of the tire. Get in and pull ahead about 2 or so feet, so that the connectors are at roughly axle height. Hook em up, flip the cams and you are done.........
 

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47studebaker said:
wdchuckhuntr said:
I've never jacked up a vehicle to install tire chains either.
then you've never been stuck !
You and I must define "stuck" differently. By the time I've got a vehicle "stuck", it's usually buried in mud or snow to the point of not being able to jack it up. If I'm putting on chains it's going to be well before that point.
 

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My dad used to run chains on his f 150 -2011 but go tired of them and lifted it and put 38 inch super swampers on and don't have to worry anymore about getting stuck , at least on the roads he runs.
 

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Chains made a huge difference on ice,super swampers don't.I made a poor decision this past weekend and went on a road with no winter maintenance.I made it about 1/4 mile before a rut caught me and pulled me into a ditch.There was several inches of wet packed snow over glare ice.I didn't have chains with me but I did have a shovel.After about an hour of digging and a little finesse,I got out.Chains would have been much easier.

I have a 4wd Kabota that I use 365 days/year.Even though it's 4wd,it's basically worthless in deeper snow or ice.Chains make all the difference in the world.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
dce said:
Chains made a huge difference on ice,super swampers don't.I made a poor decision this past weekend and went on a road with no winter maintenance.I made it about 1/4 mile before a rut caught me and pulled me into a ditch.There was several inches of wet packed snow over glare ice.I didn't have chains with me but I did have a shovel.After about an hour of digging and a little finesse,I got out.Chains would have been much easier.

I have a 4wd Kabota that I use 365 days/year.Even though it's 4wd,it's basically worthless in deeper snow or ice.Chains make all the difference in the world.


I could not possibly agree more with this. Deep snow is not what concerns me. It is how icy the back roads get around my camp and chains give me the extra traction that is essential. If you don't have chains, you won't pass those roads no matter what size or type tires you have.
 

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Trail said:
I know this don't solve your problem but if you have to use chains to get into your camp you are probably better off to just stay home!

Where's the fun in that???
 

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I have a 4wd kabota with chains on the rear.When you're on a kill that's canted,the front end wants to swing around on the ice.I went to get some chains for the front but the Kabota dealer talked me out of it.He said it was hard on the front end,plus,there isn't much clearance.It's basically worthless with all of this ice so I just had the front lugs drilled out and put some studs in.I'm curious to see if it makes a difference.
 

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Have a Kubota L 3000 DT and run chains only on the front. No problems in 4 years. I only use them in the winter and they make a huge difference on slight side slope while plowing with the back blade. Just old semi worn truck chains. Guessing I put way more stress on the front end, running the loader on dry ground without chains than plowing on ice with them.
 

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My neighbor also runs them on the front with no issues.His is a little older and he sems to have more clearance than I do.In any event.I played around with it and while it's not a 100% improvement,the studs made a pretty big difference.
 
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