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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone ever built a concrete block camp ? Looking for some advise on whay to do and also what not to do's .....
 

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I would think a CMU wall camp would be more expensive them a wood framed camp.
With that said, building a camp would be the same as any other block construction.
It would certainly hold up to more severe weather issues.
You will have to allow for PT wood window and door surrounds so you have something to anchor the windows and door too.
Running electrical and plumbing may pose a challenge if you intend NOT to frame the interior walls.
Block is a porous material so make sure you water proof where applicable.
Thermal values may not be as good as say a 2X6 framed wall construction unless you frame out the interior walls and insulate that way.
Good luck,
 

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Mgdrobert my camp is partly concrete block and the biggest problem is dampness. If I had my choice I'd like a wood frame on pillars. That way you have airflow and no concrete slab that to often is damp. Concrete block is not a problem if your there often to run a dehumidifier or have the wood stove cranked but if your gone a while mildew is a problem.
 
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I agree with Buckskin Dave. Dampness is our biggest issue. Second biggest is that paint doesn't stick to the block worth squat and we have to paint it about every third year because it peels, no matter what paint we buy. PITA. My advice is don't do block.
 

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Yep, they are damp and for that very reason paint will not hold up. As Buckskin said, stick frame on pillars, at least 3 feet above grade. Airflow is your friend in a building that will be closed up for extended periods.
 

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My buddy had a block camp and as the others stated the biggest challenge was the dampness. We install a work stove and the would help remove a lot of the moisture. But when you first arrived at camp it took a long time to remove the dampness. Also it took a long time to get the cabin up to temperature. Good luck.
 

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my wife approved perfect camp would be a concrete slab. I would set superior walls with windows on that slab and trusses directly on the superior walls. nice cozy rancher. rodent proof walls. radiant floors with outdoor wood furnace.


I would not do block. if I bought a block cabin I would build 2x4 walls or tapcon 2x4s on the block walls. then spray foam the walls. best way to get rid of dampness
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am getting the 10" cement block for basically .75 per block. this is why I am going with that. But looks like Framing walls inside is good idea. I was also told to put Foam insulation board 2" style on ground before doing floor to help with the dampness.
 

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Chester farmer, I have concrete block below ground level walls in my basement. For years I had dampness problems down there. A good friend who is a builder and home renovation guy told me to spray the walls with foam and it would solve the problem. He knows a guy who does the foam spraying. I had him stud out the walls had a few more electric outlets put in and then had the guy come with his truck and spray foam even with the face of the studs from floor to ceiling. I then had my friend build a huge cupboard for food and canned goods storage and some shelves on another wall after the foam was up. Smartest thing I ever did other than install central air. That closed cell foam gets hard and is durable and my basement is now dry as a popcorn fart and nice to be in. If the OP does build the camp out of block I highly recommend he foams the whole inside, then put his wood paneling or random plank walls or whatever over the foam. It is great insulation and keeps the dampness down. Perhaps even foam the floor if it is on a concrete pad then put the wood floor over it.
 
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I then had my friend build a huge cupboard for food and canned goods storage and some shelves on another wall after the foam was up.
Sounds like code for getting the bunker ready in case the Dems. gain control again, WW.

That spray foam is great stuff for controlling dampness on , mgd. Just don't think the foam sheets will do the same. They don't work near as well.
 

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I agree, I think the spray is the way to go. With 2x4 studs you get over 3 inches of solid foam that is hard enough to stand alone without any covering.
 

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Only thing I will say is that I have seen alot of basements that were block walls below ground that have zero water and dampness issues. The ones like this though have a good drain system, gravel backfill up to almost the top of ground level, and were properly waterproofed outside before they were backfilled. They also had a vapor barrier placed under the concrete floor. If you are building new then this is easy to do in my opinion although it will cost you a few bucks more.

No experience with the spray foam but it sounds like that is a good alternative as well from the comments above. I would still suggest a good drain system around the outside. Preventing the water from getting to the walls is a big part of the battle.

I thought about going with block on our camp, but decided to go with piers instead because of the way the ground lays.
 

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A few years ago we had to replace the floor in our camp. Before that the dampness was much worse. There is not a full basement under the camp, it is just a crawl space with a dirt floor. Before we replaced the floor, we got the heaviest grade of rolled plastic that we could find and laid that wall to wall within the block walls on top of the dirt. We placed a few other blocks on top of that in certain spots to keep it in place.
The previous floor was regular t&g boards, nothing special. This time we got 4x8 sheets of a special water resistant board-I forget what they are called. But doing those two things dramatically cut down the dampness inside. We used to go up in winter and there would be frost on the walls. Haven't had that since. It is still a little musty at times, especially this year with all the rain we've had. We also put vents on the sides to permit air flow. It all helped.
 

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Masonry and concrete attract and hold moisture, just how it is. While some measures can help keep moisture at bay, in the long run you will still be dealing with dampness.

Our camp is all wood frame construction, with the original part on block piers. The newer part is over a block crawl space, but that crawl space has ample cross flow ventilation, so dampness in the area above it, is not an issue.
 
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