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Discussion Starter #1
Heating your cabin with Fossil Fuels.

Several months ago I had given the Rooster B. a lecture regarding his new heater and purchasing a CO Detector.

"I feel that this should be known by ALL, that heat their cabins using Fossil Fuels".

Fossils Fuels Are:
Gas, Oil, Wood, Coal
Also the use of Propane Gas, Natural Gas, Kerosene, etc.

Last year many of you may have heard the deaths of several hunters in their cabin in Forkston, Wyoming Co. (not far from me)..
Their deaths were attributed to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning due to the "Improper use of a Gasoline Powered Generator".

Please invest in a CO Detector, whether it is battery operated or electric operated.
I would rather wake up to the screeching wail of a CO detector going off, than not to wake up at all..

Carbon Monoxide will kill you while you sleep!

A Smoke Detector <u>will not </u>detect Carbon Monoxide Gas.

Thanks, Mike


The following is some copied information:

What is Carbon Monoxide?
Carbon Monoxide is a colourless, odorless, tasteless, toxic gas that has the molecular formula CO. The molecule consists of a carbon atom that is triply bonded to an oxygen atom.

Carbon Monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of the fossil fuels - gas, oil, coal and wood used in boilers, engines, oil burners, gas fires, water heaters, solid fuel appliances and open fires.

Carbon Monoxide is a commercially important chemical. It is also formed in many chemical reactions and in the thermal or incomplete decomposition of many organic materials.

Dangerous amounts of CO can accumulate when, as a result of poor installation, poor maintenance or failure or damage to an appliance in service, the fuel is not burned properly, or when rooms are poorly ventilated and the Carbon Monoxide is unable to escape.

Having no smell, taste or colour, in today's world of improved insulation and double glazing, it has become increasingly important to have good ventilation, maintain all appliances regularly and to have absolutely reliable Detector alarms installed giving both a visual and audible warning immediately there is a build-up of CO to dangerous levels.

NO SMELL and NO TASTE and NO COLOUR

And, it is for these reasons that CO Detectors are the only way to alert you to increasingly dangerous levels of CO before tragedy strikes.

What are the effects of Carbon Monoxide?

Carbon Monoxide produces the following physiological effects on people exposed to the concentrations shown:

Concentration of CO in air
Inhalation time and toxic developed

50 parts per million (ppm)
Safety level as specified by the Health and Safety Executive

200 PPM
Slight headache within 2-3 hours

400 PPM
Frontal headache within 1-2 hours, becoming widespread in 3 hours

800 PPM
Dizziness, nausea, convulsions within 45 minutes, insensible in 2 hours


Carbon Monoxide poisons by entering the lungs via the normal breathing mechanism and displacing oxygen from the bloodstream. Interruption of the normal supply of oxygen puts at risk the functions of the heart, brain and other vital functions of the body.

The above information is for a healthy adult. Persons suffering from heart or respiratory health problems, infants and small children, unborn children, expectant mothers and pets can be affected by CO poisoning more quickly than others in the household and may be the first to show symptoms.
 

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Re: "CARBON MONOXIDE"

Thanks Dawg...going to stick this at the top. If I would of been thinking we should of done this weeks ago and stuck it then, hopefully the warning is heeded.

Guys when you go to buy batteries for that flashlight...PICK UP A DETECTOR!!!
 

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I just added one last year, it sounds when the stove door is open too long!
 

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<span style="color: #009900">Due to a chimney blockage in my home last year, my wife & 2 children almost died of carbon monoxide poisoning. If the dog had not thrown up, my wife could have easily sent my daughter upstairs when she complained of not feeling well. All three were only minutes from being overcome by the fumes.

Responding firemen later told me they had never had such a high reading in a home. All 3 had to under go treatment to prevent long term effects of the odorless gas. Don’t think it can’t happen to you. We’re all just one squirrel away from a blocked exhaust vent killing us.

Detectors are cheap and easy to install. Do it now. It CAN happen to you.

TTS </span>
 

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We have two in our cabin and it's one of the best investments we have made. Better safe than dead. Buy a CO detector!
It went off about two years ago and we found out that the chimney vent was broken and we were getting some major backdraft.
 

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I have one in my Camp. Heat with wall mounted ventless propane.
 
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Loggy said:
Heat with wall mounted ventless propane.
Just a heads up on this type of heater, the International Fuel Gas Code (IFGC) prohibits the use of these heaters in sleeping areas or bath rooms, with or without a CO detector. I don't have the ppm information here at the house but will post it later if someone wants to know the progression.
 
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Yes there is a difference. Some gas detectors (professional hand held models) will detect both, however most gas detectors (presuming you mean LP) will not.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
This article is copied from the WNEP Ch.16 website..


Four Found Dead in Monroe County



State police said tonight four people were found dead inside a home in the Poconos late this afternoon.

Investigators believe they are all victims of carbon monoxide poisoning.

Troopers said a relative found the four at around 4:30p.m. at the home along White Pine Road in the Winola Lakes development, off Route 209 near Marshalls Creek.

Investigators said the home was believed to be unoccupied. There was no electrcity on at the place. There was a generator found running inside.
Police are awaiting autopsy results before they rule on a cause of death. They have not released the names of the people involved pending notification of family members.

Troopers did not say why the four would be at that house in the Poconos.
 

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Shortly after WWII, many communities used "coal gas". It was just like the gas used in modern natural gas stoves, except it was made from coal. My mother was always checking the pilot light on the stove, before we went to bed.
Every year, some family in our area of PA, would die of carbon monoxide poisoning. Coal gas would kill you real quick.

Natural gas will just blow you up.
 

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Re: "CARBON MONOXIDE"

I think every ones home should be equiped with one. It saved us a couple years ago, we were awakin at about 2am by loud beeps and the message "Danger Carbon Monoxide Posioning". They really work, so all with camps or your homes , spend a few bucks and get one .
 

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About 10 years ago my aunt was working at her real estate office that her and my uncle had bought not long before. It was a refurbished row house, made into an office. My uncle was out doing house showings or what not and came back to find my aunt passed out on the floor, unresponsive. Came to be that carbon monoxide had been slowly backing up due to a clogged chimney. When my uncle found her she was minutes from death. Emergency response came, and she was flown to Crozer Chester. She made a full recovery, but scary to think of what could have been.
We have several in our house, upstairs and downstairs. When we go up to the mountains at Black Moshannon, if we rent the rustic cabins, we always take one along and plug it in...can never be too safe.
 

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Nasty stuff, had a close call several year ago in Canada on a fishing trip The gas fridge malfunctioned, luckily a couple of the younger guys slept on the floor and when they woke up released what was happening and got all of us out.
Don't think I've ever been that sick, worse headache I've ever had. Remember your worse hang over then multiply it by 10.
 

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A camp I belonged to a few years back discussed the same thing at thier yearly meeting and purchased a CO detetector and the first year that that it was installed it went off due to a malfuncting gas powered refrigerator. Spend the few dollars it is a no brainer!!!!!!!
 

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I have been a long time vister to this forum, which always has something interesting to read about. Anyway, I wanted to add my 0.02 here for some information that was not covered in this exceptionaly important topic. Where do you place a CO detector after you buy it? I would suggest that you do a little research on the enemy (CO) to learn the character traits and properties of this deadly gas at various temperatures. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe CO is typically more dense than air, thus creating a sinking gas that accumulates at the floor level and builds from that point. Usually you would want to place a detector near the floor, to alert you of the danger prior to the a high level reaching your bed elevation or second floor. I would hate to see someone doing the right thing with purchasing a detector and then installing in the wrong location beside a smoke detector on teh ceiling. Good luck and stay safe.
 

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I just bought two more for our cabin. I have one but after read this, I feel that I needed more. Thanks for the wake up call.......
 
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