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My son wants one.What are the pros and cons of each design type,plastic,alum,etc.I never fished on one and have zero experience with canoes.He seen a 16ft. alum.version for sale for around $350.There is a Coleman 17ft advertised for $150.I,ve been told to stay away from the plastic ones.Advice would be appreciated.
 

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if he just wants it for fishing i would recommend he look into a good kayak instead. Much easier to handle by yourself both getting into and out of the water and paddling around the lake/river.
 

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As BigCounty27 said a kayak is easier to handle by yourself. I have a 17ft fiberglass canoe and it is not very easy to load and unload by myself. I also have 3 kayaks that I use for fishing and like them when I am fishing smaller lakes and streams. However, if he usually is out with someone else I would get the canoe. That being said there are good and bad to the different materials they are made out of. These are just my opinion and others may feel differently.

Aluminum - light weight and durable but noisy.

Fiberglass - heavy but durable and easy to repair

Coleman (plastic)- light weight, not as easy to repair but usually the cheapest in price

Good luck and good fishing
 

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If you are new to fishing out of a canoe, I would recommend one that is wide and more stable, especially if more than one person will be fishing out of it.
Personally, I prefer a 17" Grumman squareback. Being long, they can handle more weight and gear. They are also wider and more stable. With the square back, you can use some type of motor on the back if you choose to at some point. They are bulky, but I have loaded and unloaded mine alone on many occasions.
I have never fished from a kayak so I can't offer any opinion as to a difference between the two.
 

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You'll pay for it but a Radison Sports Pal is a great little fishing canoe. I had one I believe it was the transom model - It was 12'L and about 3'W at the transom, weighs about 50lbs. They are set up to use the paddles as oars from the back seat. I put a T/M on mine battery in the middle to distribute weight. I think it was rated for around 450lbs so I was pushing it with 2 adults in it.

Now the bad part they are made out of very thin aluminum - so whitewater is out LOL. I did use mine on slower sections of the Susky but use caution round rocks OK - sharp rocks no
 

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I have been fishing out of a 17' Grumman for 30 years. It's not that hard for two people to fish out of one, just takes a little getting used to. Tell him to wear a PFD.
 

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If the 350 al one is a Grumman, go for it. They last forever. They are a little noisy and aluminum will stick to every rock you hit in the river, but they are hard to break. Plastic like the Colemans are OK, if they are taken care of, stored out of direct sunlight
 

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good ole boy said:
It,s not a Grumman.I can,t remember exactly how to spell or pronounce the name but it starts with a Q.Quintica?
Quachita. I have a 1975 Jon that is indestructible. Not one leak or loose rivet and I use it for bouncing off rocks in the Susquehanna.
 

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The aluminum canoes stick to rocks, while the modern plastic canoes slide right over them.

Also the aluminum canoes can take a strong hit from a rock at the front of the canoe. They are braced for that.

But if you get an aluminum canoe sideways against a rock, the current will wrap the canoe into a U shape around the rock, and wreck it beyond repair.

I saw this happen. The current did not look that swift. It was smooth, not whitewater. But flowing current is deceptively powerful. It crumpled that canoe like a soda can in seconds.

There are modern plastic canoes that are nearly indestructible, don't stick to rocks, and that are lighter in weight than the aluminum canoes.

Also, once they get the canoe, they should practice paddling for quite a while on a lake, then go to a slow moving river.

Read books, watch video, get instruction from someone good, whatever it takes to get good at paddling, at controlling the canoe, before taking it anywhere with fast currents, rapids etc.

I see too many people out on the streams and rivers in canoes and kayaks who have little to no ability to control the boat. Which is very dangerous.
 
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