The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 17' Coleman Canoe. It has a vertical split (crack) near the bow, 'bout 8" long. Any ideas on the best method to patch this ? Not looking for white-water type of use, simply lake float worthy. I would guess the material is some sort of Plastic or Poly blend ? Doubt it's Kevlar or something of that nature. Also, should patch be applied to bith interior and exterior ?

I actually thought about roughing up the surface, and trying JB-Weld ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,094 Posts
I read somewhere about using plastic and a solder gun to "weld" them back together.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
A concern of mine, not matter what method I try, is the crack growing once repaired. Wondering if I should drill a small hole at both the top and bottom of the crack, to effectively stop it from running.... before I make the repair ? Kind of like stopping windshield cracks from running ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,364 Posts
There are canoe repair kits for specific plastic types, just follow the directions. If you don't know the plastic type I think the Kevlar kits work on most any plastic or composite canoe but they are darn expensive. A Kevlar skid plate kit would work well too for a long crack. I put skid plate kits on to protect them and they can take a whole lot of impact and abrasion. If you ever try drilling through even thin Kevlar it's a surprising experience.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16,458 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
If you ever try drilling through even thin Kevlar it's a surprising experience
I'll bet, seein how they prove their worth from a ballistic standpoint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
I've repaired my fair share of boats being in to paddling white water you tend to beat up hulls.

To answer the drill question - yes, drill them. 1/8" bit will suffice and will stop the split.

All the boats I've repaired were made of Royalex which can be repaired quite successfully. The Colman material is a bit more difficult but I believe that G-Flex makes an epoxy that is appropriate for the application. I highly recommend using boat grade fiberglass for the repair or boat grade kevlar. Kevlar is what I turn to, it's far more durable bit harder to work with. Using the kevlar skid plate kits would work too but isn't what I would turn to first.

Also mentioned was plastic welding. This is quite successful on some kayaks and the ever increasingly popular white water canoes, I suspect similarly could be used on some of these cheaper plastic recreational canoes commonly found at the big box stores. The Coleman material however is different than the boats mentioned prior, I wouldn't count on successfully welding it and having it hold for long.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top