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I have been doing it for years. I cut my ven in bite size cubes, then blanch it in water, fill canning jars with meat and fill with cooking water seal jars and cook in pressure canner for 90 minutes. Great taste. Tried a number of additives to the meat but plain meat is the best to me.
 

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Best tasting venison in my humble opinion. Wife used to add 1 tablespoon of salt to each quart and we boiled it for 2 hours after water started to boil in a canner.
 

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Never have to worry about freezer burn. Probably one of the best ways to preserve your venison. You can take the toughest cuts of meat cube them up, pack it into jars, can it and it comes out as tender as can be. I pressure can it. Do an internet search and you'll find all kinds of different recipes/canning methods. I prefer to can mine plain and then spice it however you like when you go to use it. One of the best ways to try is to open up a jar and pull it apart with a fork add some BBQ sauce and put it on a toasted bun. I guarantee you'll be canning more.
 

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peddle-paddle said:
I highly recommend using a pressure cooker which kills any botulism. I have canned the venison as well as other meats takes some time but saves on freezer space and to me is some of the best tasting venison.
+1

It will also make your not so tender cuts of meat and make it "cut with a fork" tender. Canned meat is similar to real good pot roast. I cut it in fairly large chunks, pack it raw in quart jars, add a tsp canning salt and a 1/4 of a package onion soup mix(dry) and then pressure can it following instructions.

My kids pop open cans for snacks. They just pour some in a bowl, heat it up a little bit, and start eating!
Its such an easy meal plan since you don't have to worry about defrosting any meat. Like it was said, it saves a ton of freezer space.

We made over 50 quarts last season. We gave a few away as Christmas gifts(stick a red bow on the top lid and your done wrapping,lol), and they loved it......but mostly ate it ourselves. None left.
 

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On an average deer, 110 pound, we would cut the steaks from hind quarters and backstraps and have enough left to do 28 quarts ( 4 canner loads). We always put some beef suet in each jar, to get a good layer of fat on the top of each jar. Also, take a sawzall to the rib cage , and pack a few jars with ribs and side meat. My favorite part of a deer. Never added water, just as much meat as you can jam in jar. It'll make its own juice when it cooks in canner. Use wide mouth jars, meat comes out easier. Half teaspoon of canning salt into each jar.
To cook, I dump out jar in sink, rinse off gelatin, dip in flour,salt and pepper and fry. I like it over rice, with gravy.
Canned venison seemingly has an incredible shelf life. In 1987, we were cleaning out my Grandparents house in Moshannon, to prepare for estate auction. We came across jars of deer meat marked 1958 in the crawl space in the cellar. My uncle fried some up that evening, tasted great. Nobody will need to tell you if your seal would go bad on a jar. It'll smell.
 

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It is excellent! Buy a pressure canner and make some this year. Of the six deer I kill each year, I can two, less backstraps and tenders!
 

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rflktrman said:
boiled it for 2 hours after water started to boil in a canner.
That's the way I did it for 20 years
 
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Moss said:
rflktrman said:
boiled it for 2 hours after water started to boil in a canner.
That's the way I did it for 20 years

I started doing it that way too, but the water kept evaporating with the long boil. As you keep adding water, the boiling water would cool and stop boiling for a while, which still worked, but a hassle to keep it at a constant boil/cooking temperature. I bought a pressure canner and made it faster and easier.
 

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I agree with the pressure canning method.
"Bacterial growth is hindered by the acid in food, and meat is very low in acid. Worse yet, certain harmful bacteria thrive where natural acidity is low, and these cannot readily be destroyed at the boiling point of 212°F. To can meat, therefore, you must superheat it to 240°F, which means it must always be processed by pressure canning, not with boiling water baths, which are fine for preserving such high-acid foods as sauerkraut."

Read more: at motherearthnews
 

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Pressure Canner and 90 minutes for quart size jars.
I cut into 1" cubes and pack the jar as tight as I can with raw meat and just a dash of salt.

My wife, kids, and I all love the taste, tenderness, and ease of using canned venison. I wish I would have started doing it much sooner.
 

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Pressure Canner and 90 minutes for quart size jars.
I cut into 1" cubes and pack the jar as tight as I can with raw meat and just a dash of salt.

My wife, kids, and I all love the taste, tenderness, and ease of using canned venison. I wish I would have started doing it much sooner.
Do you still have to allow some room in the jar between the lid and the meat?
 

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Pressure canning is the way to go! I cut it in small cubes, pack in jars, a little salt and pepper. Then I pressure can as directed in my canning book. It makes it's own juice in the jars.
 
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