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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
as promised...heres a quick pictorial on exactly how it's done. I will address this from the viewpoint of someone who has NEVER done this before since, as of today, this is my first time too.

First, sanitation is key. The purpose of canning is to kill the little nasties that live in our food. Freezing is another good way to preserve food for a long time when done correctly, but canning does not require additional electricity. It only takes having to replace a fridge/freezer full of food once to recognize the benefit of having some of your meat stored by this method. So...lets begin.

Wash the appropriate number of jars for the meat you have on hand. You can always put clean jars away, or cook up the extra meat if you find you don't have enough jars (like me...)

After inspecting the jars for cracks and rough rims which would prevent a good seal, then wash the jars, rings and lids in hot soapy water - as hot as you can stand the water.




Once cleaned, then the jars need to be sanitized - a dip in boiling water will accomplish this. Keep the boiled water handy - you need to keep the lids in this until ready for use. Not BOILING water, but just below - about 180 degrees. Let the lids rest here until you need them for the packed jars. This pic shows the sanitized jars, rings, and the lids are ready for thier dunk.



I will now begin to pack my jars. What you put in them is entirely up to you. The proven recipe used by many people every year is simply a single tsp of canning salt in a quart jar, packed with raw meat as tightly as you can get it in without breaking the glass. make sure to leave 1" of head space for cold packed meat. Do not add any liquid. You will see soon that the meat will make its own liquid very quickly.

My recipe is 1/2 teaspoon salt or beef bouillon powder, 1/8 of an onion, a grind of pepper, and one clove of garlic in pint jars.

Here are my jars ready for packing (minus the bouillon powder):



When packing the meat chunks into the jars, make sure to work clean, and be sure to leave the proper amount of headspace or when you open your canner, you will have glass and venison stew. I use a small sandwich bag with the bottom cut out to keep meat off the rim of the jars.





I've read that batch processing when doing meat is not the way to go but I can't find any supporting evidence. So i find no need to lid each jar as it's packed, I lid them all at once. Here's all my jars, packed and ready for sealing. Note that the lids are ready for the hot water bath to soften up the seals.



Also note that there is more meat...It will get a fine dice and turned into street taco meat. Recipe to follow


Here's all the jars in the PRESSURE canner, ready to rock. Water filled to the line as instructed in the manual for MY canner. Yours may/will have different levels of water to maintain during the canning process. An old tip to keep white reside from forming on the jars is to add a couple table spoons of vinegar to the canning water.



My canner suggests that you bring the water inside to a boil, then place the lid, and allow it to semi-pressurize before putting the pressure regulator on. Allowing the pre-seal to engage and letting the canner vent steam for 10 mins as directed in the manual is seen here:



Process at 11 to 14 lbs pressure (10 lbs will get you to 240 deg F) and process pint jars for 75 minutes, quarts for 90. I did mine for 80. Do not quick cool the canner after the time is finished, just shut the heat off and allow the canner to cool on it's own. once the pressure vent and overpressure plug drop on their own, check for steam by tipping the regulator. DO NOT let the pressure gauge be your indication that pressure is gone. it will still read zero lbs and have a good degree of steam inside.

Once the canner has cooled and pressure is gone, remove lid, and using a can lifter, remove jars to a clean towel and allow them to rest for 12-24 hours. You should hear the lids click within the first 10 minutes if done properly.



I found it interesting just how much liquid was in the cans after the cooking had completed. be careful not to tilt the cans until they are cool to the touch, this may prevent them from sealing. I also found it interesting that the liquid inside the jars would continue to boil for some time after removing from the canner.

You are on your own for recipes for the canned product. some folks like to put some barbecue sauce into the jars before canning. I've heard that this is QUITE good. just be careful to NOT put any flour or gravy or any thickeners at all inside the cans. You can thicken after it comes out and you are preparing the canned meat.

Last note - the smell of spoiled meat might not be present when the product is cold. Be sure to heat the meat up prior to consumption just to be safe. Some folks also like to tell us that a pressure canner isn't necessary - that they've canned meat in with the water bath method for years - good for them. I won't do it. Botulism will kill you. PERIOD. it only takes once. I'm not big on Russian roulette.

Enjoy...this was easy enough that it is now a permanent part of my deer processing now that I have the pressure canner.
 

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Those jars continue to boil because liquid boils at a lower temp when in a vacume and boiling the jars created a vacume inside the jars, it is the vacume that seals them. You probably knew that.
 

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Great job. Lots of good advice there. I do it much the same way except for the baggie, lucky enough to have my Mom's old canning jar funnel! Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I did John...it was kinda neat to see


And yeah...i need a funnel. was going to cannibalize a bowl with the dremel tool, but figured the Ball brand funnels are only a couple bucks. I need some more jars, and a jar lifter too, so i might as well drop a couple bucks on the funnel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
will be cracking a can for lunch today...any requests?
 

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Thank you and great job eplaining the process that I would like to do this year. Now I have to find a recepie for deer mince meat. I had homemade deer mince meat pie many years ago. As I remember they said it was from preserved deer meat.Which is what you described here. Thanks again Dick
 

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great info, what cuts of meat are you guys using for your canned venison
 
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