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Discussion Starter #1
My family camp in Pittsfield was built on cement block/piers and is settling/sinking in one corner. We are now having issues with door frames, the deck etc. To this point we have been adjusting things to make up for the changes, but it just keeps getting worse each year. I am sure water run off and drainage probably are causing it.

I have an idea of what could be done to fix it, but have discussed it with my father and am thinking this is something we would hire out due to a lack of help and the equipment needed. The problem is being a hunting camp built in 1970, its not exactly feasible to spend a ton of money on it. I was just wondering if anyone knew of any contractors in the Pittsfield/Warren area who would be capable of doing something like this.
 

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Jack it up and put in new footers, a few bags of secrete should do it, possible as week end work detail
Ron's idea is worth a try. Minimal expense & labor involved ... and may fix your problem.
 

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Have you tried jacking the corner back up? Put a 4 x 4 across the joists in the corner that is sinking and use a bottle jack to get it back to level. Block it back up and then look into getting some French drains put in around the building.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That is exactly what I was thinking I would do- jack the corner up, get some blocking in and address the drainage issue.

The camp was built on a slope, with the front of the building near the higher end of the slope. The corner in question is on the front. The road is above grade from the building and I think water runoff from the road along with the roof are causing these issues. My grandfather put french drains in to divert water from the road around the both sides of the building, but that was 50 years ago and they probably are plugged up by now. Once the corner is back up to level, I would definitely put in new drains and probably gutters too.

The problem is my old man is getting well old and not very enthused about doing the work. We have a deck that wraps around the building above this area which makes it difficult to work. We would need to remove some of the deck. I am not sure how deep the previous footers were dug, but I am thinking this is something that would be much easier with machinery since there isnt much space to shovel with.

If I cant find someone who is capable and willing to do the work for a somewhat reasonable price, I will find a way to get it done.
 

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Hard to say without seeing it. How far off the ground is it , does the roof have gutters, how big is the cabin. I am sure what everyone else has said is the way to go. It really isn't that big of a job. Jack it up back to level than add a footer. Again not sure what kind of ground you are sitting on but if you can get it to solid put a footer in. A 6X6 should do it or if you have a bit of help a piece of sonatube then fill with cement.
 

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Are your piers sinking or are the beams that rest on them rotting?
 

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We had the same thing done to our camp last year, it was done by Peachey Consturctuon out of Belleville pa, they did a fabulous job
 

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Once the corner is back up to level, I would definitely put in new drains and probably gutters too....
Remove the word that is underlined above. If you're going to do part of the job do the rest. There is a serious amount of water that comes off of a roofing during a rain. Getting the water away from the piers is critical
 

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We had a similar problem. Used sonoatubes filled with concrete to make new piers. Came out perfect. We do have gutters and french drains.
 

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Two of the six block piers the original part of our cabin is on, tilted a bit, several years ago. All six were installed on dug/poured footers that were supposed to be below the frost line, when we built an addition on a block wall perimeter foundation.

The pier blocks were laid up "dry" (no mortar) and cross stacked on the footer pads.

It took 20 years for two to tilt a bit. Both were on the back side where water tends to accumulate in heavy rains. I wasn't there when dad had the footers dug and poured, so don't know if the contractor dug them deep enough, or not? The other four pier footers and the rest of the foundation has held up fine since the mid 80s.

Several years ago I jacked up the part of the shanty where the two piers had tilted, removed two courses of block; put forms around the remaining blocks at ground level, Poured concrete to level the blocks below ground level, then put the other blocks back in. This time I installed additional wood under the floor framing, so the weight wasn't just on the outside corner of the piers, but evenly spanned on the top of the piers. No problems since.

5 ton bottle jack and some 6x6 PT blocks to sit the jack on, worked fine to jack it up and re-level things. So far, no more tilted piers.
 
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