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I am lining up my project list for 2014 and I am thinking about removing the exterior siding from my camp and replacing it with something that is simple to install and can be done a little at a time, average to low cost, maintenance free that will last 25 years or more, rustic looking. Can anyone give me some suggestions other than vinyl siding?
 

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for rustic find a local saw mill and get rough cut pine or hemlock. let it dry a year properly stacked, install and hit it a coat of preservative.

easiest by far though is T111.
 

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The problem is if you no/low maintenance so the wood sidings would be out but metal seems to be a good fit for you since vinyl is out also. I put vinyl on the new camp just so we don't have to pressure wash treat or paint every so often.
 

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It's not zero maintenance but I'd call it low maintenance. I did 5/8" T-111 and stained it with high quality stain. 6 years out it still looks great. I'm guessing by what I see, it'll be 10-15 years before I have to
re-stain. It wasn't cheap though.... 40 sheets of T-111 caught on sale and over 20 gallons of stain. That stuff was thirsty!
 

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if you have porky problems you need vinyl or metal. those critters are not in abundance around my place fortunately.
 

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We went with metal also. Last a long time, almost zero maintenance, installs in a snap and doesn't look half bad in the maroons and dark green colors.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I went with a dark green metal roof in hopes of some sort of brown siding.

Keep the suggestions rolling fellas.
 

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A lot of people near me use slab wood. It looks pretty good.
 

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Squeaks said:
Porcupines love T-111. We had it on my father in laws and the ate it up like candy.
Excellent point! I forgot to mention that. Don't use T-111 if there are Porkys anywhere near you! (unless you spend the dough for treated T-111)

I don't have a problem but that's because the camp is a mobile and we skirted it with 3x5 treated timbers and did the bottom few feet of the walls with treated 3x5 landscape timbers slabbed to look like logs. I had wall taller than 8' and trimmed the bottom with the slabs. Slow tedious work but we're happy with the look.

 

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Rough cut white and red oak from a sawmill. Let it air dry for a year - including the winter, don't cheat.

Our old camp was sided with rough cut oak and it lasted just shy of 60 years.

Once we drilled the holes for the nails, got it nailed up in an overlapping pattern, we slapped on half a dozen gallons of boiled linseed oil mixed with turpentine to thin it down. I was told that this mixture turned into some type of crystalline molecular structure that bonded with the wood on a molecular level. I don't know but it looked great, never was painted or re-oiled and lasted until the fire took her down.


Terry
 

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Mugsy has the right idea. I was a government contractor for twenty-some years and about every building at Camp David has the type of siding he's describing. It's called "Flitch Siding" and it's installed similar to regular wood siding. It's actually slabs of kiln dried red or white oak just as they were sawn from the log. The bark has been removed, of course and they're applied to the wall in overlapping fashion with the butt joints sawn on the forty-five. The most important thing about installing this type of siding is to be sure that you continue with the correct width of siding on any particular course. Another words, if you start a course with ten inch wide boards, continue using ten inch wide boards for that course. The next course could be six or eight inches wide. It's just important to use the same width per course around the building.

After you get the siding on, you can caulk the joints and paint or simply use the finish that Mugsy refered to above. It creates a very primitive, yet handsome looking finish.
 

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Acorn,my buddy did that on his 16x32 in WV and it looks like a log cabin, just be careful to use galvanized nails so they don't run and streak the siding, he bought his from a dealer and put it on himself, just he and the Mrs.,
 

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Here is the link to the vinyl log siding that we covered our 1950 camp with.

http://www.timbermillsiding.com/c357-log_cabin_siding.aspx

New Timbermill® Simulated Cedar Log siding from Style Crest® offers everything you love about natural cedar…

Except the sanding, staining, splintering, warping, weathering and worry. It’s the high performance, low-maintenance, affordable alternative to wood. Perfect when used as a primary siding, or as an accent to stone, brick or other cladding. Timbermill® is available in four profiles, to replicate four popular cedar siding patterns and two stunning, no-fade colors. Recreate your favorite natural cedar look and never have to undertake the maintenance that actual wood siding demands.



• Knots and grain patterns give a realistic wood appearance

• Panels available in a variety of patterns to achieve an authentically random look

• Blends well with traditional siding materials when used as an accent

· Available in American Cedar or Forest Brown you choose…….
 

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"Vinyl is final" is the saying builders go by but when I build my camp it will be hemlock board & batten sprayed with a bug and rot free mixture of used motor oil and kero.
 

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jakesroost said:
They make vinyl siding that looks like cedar shakes and stuff that looks like stacked stone
Yes they do but unless you are Dr. or lawyer most of us can not afford it. I use to buy & sell siding and roofing products for a large lumber company. I could buy it from the supplier for approx. $250 per half square and that is not retail pricing. Add another 30-50 % for a counter sale.
 
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