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Discussion Starter #1
I am thinking bout building my own flintlock. I am good at wood working an i think I could build my own muzzleloader. I am wondering if anyone knows some supply places to get the parts i need.
 

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Check out some of the threads on this in the traditional forum....lots of good info there recently. Then have a great time building! You'll do great!
 

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For a first time build I would recomend a Jim chambers or Brad Emig,cabin creek kit.Both jim and Brad have a selection of different schools of rifles.

Brad Emig is in York Co. Dont know where you are located?

You also want to get Chuck Dixons book (The Art of Building the Pennsylvania longrifle)Buy the book first and read.
 

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Another source of parts is Pecatonica River Longrifle Supply. Good selection, quick shipping.

I usually order the lock and trigger separately from L&R Lock Co.
 

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If you are in western Pa you may want to check out Log Cabin gun shop in Lodi Ohio.
 

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Head to the Gunmakers Fair in July at Dixons.Lots of people to help and supplies there.
 

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Take I 76 west of Akron, where I 76 meets I 71, Lodi is just a mile or so west of the intersection. It's about 2 1/2 hrs from The Emlenton exit on I 80.

We always stopped there when we went to Friendship for the Nationals.

Makes a nice road trip to load up with goodies for winter projects.

Thats where the parts for my long rifle, the one I carry for the moraine hunt, came from 30 years ago, man, time fly's
.
 

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buy your parts[lock trigger,barrel,but plate,nose piece lugs,barrel wedges ramrod etc....] cut your own stock......if the barrel isnt swamped.....strait octagon .. you can cut barrel channel with a table saw.... the hardest part is finding a good piece of wood....buy a tube of tints all.....start fitting parts.....you can buy historical blueprints for the gun you want to build....less than 20$ i use TRACK OF THE WOL:F....The last snow storm just dropped my next gunstock right on the road near my house.....my buddy is cutting it into stock size piece.......let it dry a while......time for a new FLINTER!!!! havent even shot the one i just finished! need a fullstock! OH NO ANOTHER ADDICTION!!!!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks evryone for the info.....I love the muzzleloader an i own a flintloc and a percussion both in 50cal. I'm pretty handy with wood working an I really think I could build a nice gun.

To build the gun I would imagine getting the barrel channel straight is probally the most difficult part.The rest doesn't seem all that bad to do.
What wood do you suggest? Maple or chestnut?
 

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curly or striped maple for me also.

You can get blanks with the barrel channel roughed in, If I remember correctly some even have the ramrod drilled in the rough blanks so after it is shaped all you have to do is inlet the entry thimble.

enjoy
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I think that the blank idea is good at lewast for my first try.I just think it'll be fun and worth the time.
 

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Whether you use maple, walnut or cherry, make sure you get a hard piece. Nothing is worse than trying to inlet a soft blank. Wood varies piece by piece. Tell your supplier you want a hard or dense piece. If you have the luxury of picking out your own, take notice that some blanks are heavier than others. Weigth equals hard and dense.

I would not recommend cherry for a first time builder. Some is very brittle and breaks out easily. Straight grain wood is easier to work that fancy. Keep your chisels sharper than sharp and with some patience you'll do fine.

One nice thing about walnut is if you find mistakes after the gun is finished it's easy to resand just the spot and blend in the finish. With maple you can't do that. The finish won't allow the stain to soak in.

And don't use oil stains like the big box stores sell. You want dyes or aqua fortis for maple.
Bill
 
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