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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
is there any good reference material for building one. i have never done it. i would like to make my own stock from a blank to not just buy a kit and assemble it. any help or ideas?
 

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I was just watching the PCN channel last weekend and they were showing a gun fair all about building black powder guns. I think the fair was somewhere in Leigh Valley. That would have been the place to be to learn about building a flintlock rifle.
 

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Recreating the American Longrifle, by William Buchele is a great read and very helpful. It was reccomended to me (by some here on HPA about a year or two ago) because I want to eventually do the same. I just don't have the time yet.
 

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Chuck Dixon also put out a book about building long rifles. The illustrations are black and white drawings but really help you understand the text quite well. The tips are excellent. Some of the diagrams and tips are how to make tools that will make the job easier, etc. I got Dixon's book before I finished my first. It was a huge help, not only with that gun, but with doing some other things as well,

There program on PCN was the Dixon's Gun Maker's fair. You can probably get a dvd copy from PCN. And is you ever get to eastern PA, put Dixon's on the list of "must" stops. Locks, barrels stocks, and tons of good advice.
 

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Chuck's book is The Art of Building the Pennsylvania Longrifle. Building a longrifle is on my to do list. One of these days
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I would start at Dixons for reference material and literature and also to take a look at flinteres that are already built. I am headed there tomorrow to check out chisels and some other building support suplies. I just purchased a Jim Chambers kit as my first build. I am no where ready to undertake a rifle buld from an iron pipe and tree limb. I want to start with a quality kit and then try more challenging items - <u>if</u> I can handle it!
 

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Both of the books recommended are great! If you have never built a longrifle, I would recommend a Jim Chambers "kit". You will be working with top knotch components, and will produce an heirloom that will truly be yours. Chuck Dixon's book actually has some good thoughts on the differencs between a builder and a stocker, and Chuck himself has some good philosophy which he will share with you face-to-face if you can make the trip. JMHO, and best of luck whatever you decide!!
 

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Yo Mccoy - can you share some particulars on that rifle: barrel manuf. lock (looks like a Siler), what style of rifle is that? Sure looks good.
 

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Brad Emig fowler "kit". Large Siler lock, Colerain .62 smoothbore barrel (20 gauge). I stained the stock with aqua fortis. Hand rubbed linseed finish. It throws roundballs into 1-hole 3 shot groups at 50 yards off of the bench, and even without a choke I found a way to get 79% patterns of #6 copper plated shot at 27 yards. It's been good on pheasants and squirrels, but I haven't taken a turkey or deer with this one yet....
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
just went to dixon's and cabelas yesterday. i bought chuck's book for $22. i looked at all the guns and supplies. WOW!!! talk about endless options for locks and stocks and everything. really nice shop too. what should i do now get materials or a kit or just read the book first?
 

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I got chucks book and then put a pistol kit together. Of course back then you could get aCVA Kentucky FLint pistol kit for about $50.00. Then I was ready to tackle a rifle. In fact, I have made a few guns, bought locks, barrels and furnitutre and cut the stock out myself from a plank.
 

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Read the book until you are comfortable with the steps of a build. Then get a "kit" from one of the reputable suppliers. You cannot go wrong with Brad Emig at Cabin Creek Muzzleloaders, or Jim Chambers. Both provide top notch components and want you to be successful. Good luck! I'm sure you'll do well!!!
 

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New builders should be reminded that the kits sold be Emig, Chambers and others are not "KITS" when compared to what T/C and others offered. They are a collection of matching parts with a piece of wood with a lot of rough shaping done. All parts have to be finished inletted, all holes drilled and tapped and at least 1/16", more like 1/8" taken off the stock. Barrels need to be draw filed and polished. Casting are just that, rough castings. Trigger placement is scary for a novice. Fowler kits also need soldering.

Chambers does not come with instruction, but he will answer questions via phone or email. I would think Emig's kits are sold the same way.

Even a very experienced builder will take 15 to 20 hours to put a Chambers kit together in the white. A T/C kit can be completed in an afternoon.

Not trying to scare anyone, just realize what your buying. Building a gun does not take the brain of Einstein, but it require the patience of Job.

I've never built on of Emig's kits, but I know his work is top notch. I just finished a Chambers fowler and had no problems.

Brad Emig and Jim Chambers will both be at the Lewisburg show in early February if you can wait that long. It's great to talk in person.

Bill
 

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tobyje said:
Even a very experienced builder will take 15 to 20 hours to put a Chambers kit together in the white. A T/C kit can be completed in an afternoon.

Bill
If you can build a gun from components in 15-20 hours, that is amazing. I did hear that Chambers "kits" are the easiest to build. I put at least 30-40 hours into a Peccatonica gun, and even longer into a Tip Curtis fowler.
There are several steps that the supplier may be able to help you with, and I'd reccommend for first timers, like soldering the under lugs for you and cutting in the sight channels. Get a drill press also, unless you are a real artist with a hand drill. And sharp chisels and gouges.
You can also check out http://www.trackofthewolf.com/(S(jb1q3d552vvjzxnondpup545))/Index.aspx
 

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Any body who puts a TC kit together in an afternoon, took $400 in parts and turned it into a $200 gun. Aint no way a proper stock finishing can be done in less than 4 hours time. Even allowing time in between sessions for drying, etc. Sure you can give it a rough sand and slap some varnish on it. And that is what it will look like too.

The first time I cut a dovetail for a sight probably took me an hour. I could probably do one now in 15 minutes, after the 15 minutes to find the tools.
 
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