The HuntingPA.com Outdoor Community banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
14,137 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
https://www.connectradio.fm/2019/02/21/buck-in-clearfield-county-tests-positive-for-cwd/?fbclid=IwAR1Rd9kq7frl7ZTzGvTIrJ3NAUptRvlUu9Ad-tBUJ5XUymr-y3DnHejsNPw

Posted on February 21, 2019 by wcednews
Harrisburg, PA – The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture announced that a doe on a Bethel Township, Fulton County breeding farm, and a buck on a Bloom Township, Clearfield County hunting preserve have tested positive for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD).

Both farms will remain under quarantine for five years from the date the positive tests were confirmed. The department also quarantined the Fulton County farm where the buck had been purchased four weeks prior to its harvest in Clearfield County.

Neither deer tested showed signs of CWD prior to its death. Both deer were born and raised in an area of Fulton County where wild deer have tested positive for CWD since 2015 and captive deer have tested positive since 2017.

The department’s Pennsylvania Veterinary Laboratory in Harrisburg tested the deer, as required by the department’s CWD program. Positive test results were confirmed at the National Veterinary Services Laboratories in Ames, Iowa.

CWD attacks the brain of infected deer, elk and moose. There is no known treatment or vaccine. Animals can get the disease through direct contact with saliva, feces and urine from an infected animal, or contaminated environment. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there have been no reported cases of CWD infection in people.

Clinical signs of CWD include weight loss, excessive salivation, increased drinking and urination, and abnormal behavior like stumbling, trembling, and depression. Infected deer and elk may also allow unusually close approach by humans or natural predators.

The infectious agent, known as a prion, tends to concentrate in the brain, spinal column, eyes, spleen, and lymph nodes. To prevent disease spread, these high-risk parts must be properly handled and disposed of where the animal is killed. Parts such as deboned meat, clean skull caps and capes present little risk and may be taken home.

The Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture coordinates a mandatory surveillance program for the disease for 874 breeding farms, hobby farms and hunting preserves across the state. Since 1998, accredited veterinarians and certified CWD technicians have tested more than 39,000 captive deer in Pennsylvania, of those, 96 have tested positive.

The Pennsylvania Game Commission collects samples from hunter-harvested deer, and elk and wild deer that appear sick or behave abnormally.

Find more information about Pennsylvania’s captive deer CWD programs, and the department’s broader efforts to safeguard animal health, at agriculture.pa.gov.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,574 Posts
..I just cant comprehend why these places aren't shut down....seems like the owners want to continue to be a part of the problem...NOT the solution...and the people that use these facilities are just as much to blame. ya...I said it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
So when these deer farms and hunting preserves finally get a positive test in every county to include the Elk heard, can we rest easy knowing that the entire state will be quarantined for 5 years? Insanity...... Also what hunting preserve?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,482 Posts
These places are where the disease originated. Ever notice that every time there is an outbreak in a new place it is on or near a deer farm? Coincidence?....I don't think so!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,206 Posts
there was a deer farm whiskey run whitetails that closed and took down its fences in clearfield county right before the 1st "wild" buck was found nearby 2 years ago. coincidence ? seems every time cwd pops up in the wild its in close proximity to a deer farm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,596 Posts
There is big money in those game farms and it supplies revenue in this state. The PGC must of been doing to good of a job when they monitored those farms that the state took it away. They have a strong lobby that have influence on our legislators.It will take a Pa citizen effort to voice our concerns to legislators with our votes to make them listen and do the common sense thing.Those pirons can last in the soil for a long time so closing a farm and taking down fencing does not end the problem. If some people need the thrill of a kill just go pay your local farmer to shoot a cow in his field. It would be a cheaper fee and would have more meat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Cannot believe that the Dept of Ag does not ban the shipment of live deer from Disease management areas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,544 Posts
Quarantined for 5 years??? Prions last how long? And in the meantime the deer farm goes out of business and the fences are no longer taken care of, and....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
A family is trying to start a "deer farm" adjacent to the SGL I hunt on in Crawford County, I was in total shock when I seen the fencing ! Apparently they purchased 2 doe and were trying to purchase a buck during this years rifle season. They don't have enough property to attempt to be a hunting preserve so it would strictly be a breeding farm.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,786 Posts
How much slower would CWD have spread if it these stupid deer farms were not around. probably wouldn't even be in PA yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts

·
Banned
Joined
·
26,979 Posts
You do not take the fences down, you pass a law that they must stand for 100 years! in addition another fence must be built at least 10 feet high and no less than 8 feet away from the original. Let the idiots who started the epidemic pay for their sins!
 
  • Like
Reactions: BOWHUNTERZ7

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,868 Posts
I'm not sure about that.The outbreak in Bedford county was most likley spread by CWD that came from Maryland.Where that originated from,I don't know.The deer in DMA3 were definately infected from captive deer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,054 Posts
I can't understand why people even use or support game farms
they have no other means to hunt? (being serious)


A serious answer... almost 1.5 million acres of Game Lands, 2.2 million of State Forests and additional land in State Parks. Plus County and Municipal Parks and Conservancies.

No other means but stocked land is what I call B_S.
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top