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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What type of broadheads do u guys think give the best performance, ie. bloodtrail, tissue damage, fast recovery?
I used spitfires in the past, and they were ok, recently I have been using slick trick, and they are by far the worst I have ever used. I shot a doe on Saturday, and only found it, after searching for hours. There was no blood trail to speak of, I only found by luck.I used them last year also, and the deer ran off and when I found it it was standing looking at me after about 45 minutes. I left and came back 1/2 hr later and it was dead in the same spot. I hit it right behind the shoulder. I was wondering about the shwaker, or grim reaper broadheads? Thanks in advance, Jim Reilly.
 

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Where did you hit her? Post a pic. If you have very little or no blood, most of us already know where you hit her before you even post the pic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hit her right in the middle of the liver, I was in a treestand, so the arrow exited low on the other side. The exit hole wasnt that big.
 

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In order for a broadhead to work,it has to stay together,be razor sharp and penetrate deeply.Most importantly,it needs to hit the right spot.

Broadhead design has very little to do with how well of a blood trail you'll get or how quickly a deer will die.There are a ton of variables that determine how much a deer will bleed or how fast they'll die.The one variable that stays constant is shot placement.No broadhead can make up for that.

I'm fortunate because I get to kill alot of deer in a controlled hunt and I also get to track twice as many deer each year as I kill.I can tell you for a fact that what's on the end of your arrow is nowhere near as important as where that arrow hits.Just as important is what you do after the shot.
 

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JimR, read this thread. It has great information, but the wait times really should be longer than what is posted.
http://www.huntingpa.com/forums/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=1886251#Post1886251

The liver doesn't hold much blood, that is why you didn't have much of a blood trail, plus the blood has to travel through the fur a longer ways. If you hit the lungs high, you won't get much blood either but that deer is still going to die. It doesn't matter what broadhead you use as lkong as it is sharp, you won't get much blood from those shots for close to 50 yards.
 

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I have used Wasp Jackhammers for quite some time. I began using them when I was still hunting with a compound bow and took several deer and one elk with them before I made the quantum leap to crossbow hunting. I have taken two deer with them since and had no problem finding a blood trail. The last one looked like someone had been throwing cupfulls of red paint out both sides of her escape trail.
 

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dce said:
In order for a broadhead to work,it has to stay together,be razor sharp and penetrate deeply.Most importantly,it needs to hit the right spot.

Broadhead design has very little to do with how well of a blood trail you'll get or how quickly a deer will die.There are a ton of variables that determine how much a deer will bleed or how fast theyshot placement'll die.The one variable that stays constant is . No broadhead can make up for that.

I'm fortunate because I get to kill alot of deer in a controlled hunt and I also get to track twice as many deer each year as I kill.I can tell you for a fact that what's on the end of your arrow is nowhere near as important as where that arrow hits.Just as important is what you do after the shot.
 

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dce said:
In order for a broadhead to work,it has to stay together,be razor sharp and penetrate deeply.Most importantly,it needs to hit the right spot.

Broadhead design has very little to do with how well of a blood trail you'll get or how quickly a deer will die.There are a ton of variables that determine how much a deer will bleed or how fast they'll die.The one variable that stays constant is shot placement.No broadhead can make up for that.

I'm fortunate because I get to kill alot of deer in a controlled hunt and I also get to track twice as many deer each year as I kill.I can tell you for a fact that what's on the end of your arrow is nowhere near as important as where that arrow hits.Just as important is what you do after the shot.
 

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DCE summed it up.....Hit them in the right spot.

dce said:
In order for a broadhead to work,it has to stay together,be razor sharp and penetrate deeply.Most importantly,it needs to hit the right spot.

Broadhead design has very little to do with how well of a blood trail you'll get or how quickly a deer will die.There are a ton of variables that determine how much a deer will bleed or how fast they'll die.The one variable that stays constant is shot placement.No broadhead can make up for that.

I'm fortunate because I get to kill alot of deer in a controlled hunt and I also get to track twice as many deer each year as I kill.I can tell you for a fact that what's on the end of your arrow is nowhere near as important as where that arrow hits.Just as important is what you do after the shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Its really nice of you to send me this again, just incase I didnt see it the last 4 times. Thanks, JimR
 

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no problem bud...thats what I'm here for.

Have a great season!

JimR said:
Its really nice of you to send me this again, just incase I didnt see it the last 4 times. Thanks, JimR
 
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