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Discussion Starter #1
Something I've started doing lately is brining my steaks and tenderloins rather than marinating them, seems to leave the meat firmer and lets the flavor of the meat itself shine through a little better. What I've been doing, though, is far from exact, just boiling 2 tablespoons of salt per quart of water and then kinda randomly adding rosemary, thyme, parsley, red and black pepper, and whatever else looks good in the spice cabinet. Anybody have any guidance on some good brines?
 

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whatever else looks good in the spice cabinet
That's how I flavor everything.


Curious though, why are you boiling it?
 

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I got that. But why? Does it bring out the spices better? I've never boiled a brine.
 

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I usually use colony sauce as a marinade base. I've never used a brine. What I can recommend for a spice is after you dig up some wild leeks (ramps) dry them in a dehydrator and then gind them into a powder. I usually add leek powder, garlic powder and cracked black pepper to a small amount of colony sauce (a little bit goes a long way) and marinade for a day or two. Leek powder is great as a meat spice and are really good on fried eggs.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
InVenangoNow said:
I always at least boil the salts and sugars. Helps dissolve
Exactly, the brine is saltier than you can get to dissolve at room temperature. It does seem to get the volatile chemicals to leach out of the herbs a bit faster too, turns the brine into a sort of herb tea.
 

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Thanks, Hippie. I see the point for boiling, I just never found the need to do so. I do use warm to hot water when dissolving the sugar and salt, and never had problem with lack of dissolving.
But when it comes to mixing herbs, I'll bow to your experience.
 

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Sounds to me like you're not marinating or brining, you're corning the meat, but just not leaving it in the solution long enough to achieve the final results.
 

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mountainhippie said:
What's the difference between brining and corning?
In your case it would be the amount of time you're leaving it in the brine. Make it six days and you'll have a nice piece of corned venison.
 
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