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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone ever send there bow to one of those places that does what they call a "super tune"? They supposedly take it apart and clean, adjust cams & go over everything. Then they use an automatic bow shooter with your arrows to make sure everything looks good.

A new string and cable are included.

If you have used them what was your experience?

Thanks
 

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I had mine done ! I sent it to a guy in Pinkerton, Ohio ! I can't remember the name right off the bat but he did a great job checked timing, cam lean, new strings and cables, new peep,d-loop and string silencers and checked the speed ! I was very happy with his work ! It cost me $100 for everything including shipping !
 

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I'm not sure I'd want to do that.

For the maintenance aspect, sure. Sounds good.

Tuning....I've always felt that I needed to tune the bow with me as the shooter. Easton's Tuning Guide makes this a fairly painless process you can generally do in an hour or so and then you know it's gonna shoot for you.

I've just had too much time with bows, rifles, etc, with setups that are "theoretically perfect" but aren't right for how I hold it, shoot it, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I understand what you are saying and those are my thoughts also. I do use the easton guide to tune my bow, but thought while I'm getting new strings I might let them take it a part and go over everything. The place I was looking at has an automatic shooter so it takes the exact same shot (same form) every time. They do it with your arrows and claim they will get them to shoot in the same spot or weed out the imperfect arrows.
 

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I would think it would be a good starting point for you, at least, to then fine tune it when you get it back.
 

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I was kinda worried about that before I sent mine out ! The peep and kisser button being right where it needed to be ! When I got it back I did have to move my sights a little bit but everything was right on ! But since getting my new bow I have done everything myself with the help from the guys and stickys on Archerytalk.com I want to learn everything I can about setting up and adjusting my own bows !
 

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Be careful on AT, though. Inject some reality into what you read there.

I've learned a lot reading there, but you'll find that some of the folks there go off the deep end and beyond, lol.
 

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Just making sure... :)

The shop where I get my stuff and have work done has told me horror stories of guys who read stuff on there (and other places) and then just dove in head first, and then wind up with a repair bill.
 

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Of course a shop might tell you horror stories and there probably are some from individuals who don't follow directions. They don't make any money when you do it yourself. However there is plenty of easy instructions on tuning, set a bow back to specifications and the type of equipment needed. All that is need the manufacture specs., a proper bow press, a bow vise helps and a few tuning devices. There are different methods which work well. The cost of the equipment should be a one time expense or to save a few bucks one can share with others. This is good knowledge to have, whereas, if anything goes wrong with a bow/strings/cables/peeps it will probably happen just prior to the season, during a 3D shoot or at heat of the season and there are often back logs at the local archery store. And as they say, if you want something done right ......do it yourself. If you have an archery buddy who does his own often they are glad to help.
 

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The shop where I go does all labor for no cost if you bought the bow there. They just relimbed a 2009 Bowtech for me for no cost to me. Not one penny.

One the best things, imho, a bowhunter can do is find a good local shop that can and does provide support for their products, and then work with that shop. Not saying people shouldn't tune their bows...they should.

But they should also fully understand where the line is for them, and not cross it. That's all.
 

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If you want to learn about setting up your own bow, one of the best videos is John Dudley setting up his target bows. He goes over everything from out of the box till competition ready.The video is long. I believe he has a couple of them up now. he might even have one for his hunting bow.
 
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