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Discussion Starter #1
my browning bow is 11 yrs old now. i'm just wondering what you guys look for to decide if it has another year left or if it's time to hang it up and get a new one. it still shoots consistent and i can't see any cracks or anything anywhere. it's a split limb single cam and the limbs seem to be twisting in a little out at the cam which puts the cam at a slight angle. that torque is common with a single cam though isn't it? or are the limbs or pockets worn out or something? other than that it's in great shape. it shoots consistent groups and seems to maintain draw weight fine year after year without having to increase the setting point. i haven't run it through a chrony lately so i'm not sure what it's putting out these days. any other things i should be looking for??
 

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For me to feel comfortable with it, I would have the local shop check it out. Hopfully they are more concerned about giving good advice and gaining a customer, and not trying to sell a new bow.

I got my last bow in 03', before that, I had a bear whitetail II.
 

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It's up to the user. I started getting that itchy feeling after ten years.
The bow still operated fine, but I looked at the inevitable. It had given great value, so I thought of change.

I did it for several reasons. What if the only bow broke within a week of the start of archery season? If the bow picked the time, would I be able to buy the new bow I wanted?
In fact, after ten years what bow would I have bought under pressure. Plus the old bow was paid for many times over.

So now I have a four year old bow and a still working backup. I've been a bow hunter, private practicing, non 3D shooter. And it worked out.

If one bow goes out of service now, I'd have options. I like having the options.

As I said, everyone makes their own good choices, if they have them.

Because there was no absolute rush, I spent two months, in the spring, picking a new one. I also got to pick my price range. I bought the new bow and in the next month I bought the accessories.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
so it may be best to let the shop i go to check it out and see if they catch anything. i've already inquired about a new hoyt there so i may not get an honest review. but the guy i dealt with this time seemed pretty cool. he even tried to talk me down from the maxxis because of the cost, so maybe he'll be good to me.
at this point i wouldn't say that i need a new bow, i just wanted one. i've been making excuses to talk myself into it but in reality the one i have would probably be just fine. if the shop gives it a thumbs up, maybe i'll just make some changes or upgrades with accessories to make me feel better.


thanks guys.
 

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Everyone gets the itch for a new bow after a few years. I always keep the old one fully set up and ready to go in an emergency, always take 2 bows when I go out west. My newest bow is shorter and lighter than any of the old ones I have owned but does it shoot any higher scores on the range? Still after 4 or 5 years I just had to have it!
 

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My last 2 replacements were due to cracks forming in the limbs. The bow prior to those (79 Bear Alaskan) I retired when the limbs maxed out went below 60# draw. Originally was a 60-70# bow. Lasted 18 years. The other two after it didn't make it 18 added together!
 

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Just retired my old Hoyt Deviator of 12 years. Still shot good and I killed my biggest buck with it this past fall. The strands on the edges of the limbs were starting to seperate so that is one reason. Two, after shooting some of the newest bows, it was really hard to even think about using the old one. So if you are not completely dedicated to buying a new bow this year, don;t go shoot the new ones!!!!
 

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With the way bows are made today, if they are taken care of properly, they can outlive the owner for sure. Its all up to the user. I usually end up getting at least one, but usually two, new ones every year (via archerytalk), and sell the old ones (also via archerytalk). I have also traded several times using that site. When I find one I really like, like I did with my PSE Bowmadness XL, I'll keep it longer. The X Force GX7 on the other hand, is ready for a new owner pretty soon.
 

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keep that one as a back up, and buy a new bow.


The one I currently use is 15 years old and functions perfectly. I don't feel a need to replace it yet.
 

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I would take it and have it checked out at a shop and if its ok keep for a back up. I had a string break on a weekend trip to camp and without my back up i would have not been able to keep hunting. I am looking at new bows now because i sold my backup to a buddy to hunt with last year.
 
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