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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased 90 acres in Ohio. The property was select cut 5 years ago and now has a decent under growth. Several areas of the property are more open then others. I would like to plant strategic areas with evergreens. I have a couple of questions.

1.) I am trying to find which evergreens will grow the fastest and be less likely to be over browsed by deer during the seedling stage.

2.) Should fertilizer of any type be added to the seedlings when planted?

3.) Where can I purchase seedlings to plant (looking at planting 1,000 to 2,000 over the next 2 years)

As you can tell, I am just starting my research on this topic and would appreciate any advice you may have.

Thanks,

Ben
 

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Ben,I'm not sure on 1 and 2 because I'm in the same situation you are in. I can tell you that the cheapest seedlings that I have found is through the PGC. If you goto the habitat forum and scroll down to the 3rd or 4th topic, you'll see a topic called PGC Seedlings. You can find the link to the pgc's web site in there and you will see all the seedlings they offer. They are def the cheapest I have found and from what I read they are great quality seedlings!


Correction: I think I may have read that the PGC seedling program is for PA Property owners. Not sure if you could buy them for OH property, so check that out.
 

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FIRST OF ALL....CONGRATS!!! That sounds great.


The PAGC sells their trees for use in PA....I mean you can buy them as long as you have a PA mailing address, but it kind of side steps the intent for them pricing and growing them to improve PA habitat. And yes they are very nice and priced great.

WHat are you looking for the evergreens to do? That might be more important then just quick growth rate....thermal cover? for deer or small game? Screen view from the road? Clump or row plantings?

I have never used fertilizer on evergreens so no comment there on results. I have used a root dip but not always, and never really gauged its success with or without.
 

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Beck trt, you can contact your Washington Co conservation district and ask them for info. The districts have spring sapling sales and sell at a nice price. Also, USDA may be helpful and can direct you to growers. We have planted over 1000 native hardwoods, and almost 700 native shrubs and conifers. Norway Spruce are recommended for softwood planting as the deer don't really browse them unless there is a really bad winter. Tree tubes, stakes and bird/bug net capping will be recommended too (not for conifers). PM me if you'd like more info.
 

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Mussers in Indiana is one of the largest pine tree growers. Large selection of species and sizes. Find out what species do good in that area of ohio. Call and ask for a WHOLESALE catalog.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Rooster, the sole purpose of Why I want to plant evergreens is to provide wildlife a sanctuary to escape hunters and climate. I would like to see it grow as thick and nasty as possible. The reason for fast gowth is hopefully it will provide better hunting a little faster.

Stackbarrel, I will contact you and I appreciate any help. I am going to spend some money and a lot of my time making this property as productive as possible and I am trying to limit my mistakes to only minor ones:)
 

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Congratulations on buying the Ohio property! You've already gotten some good advice on here. Another good source of information might be the Ohio forestry agency county service forester. He should be able to come out to your property free of charge and offer advice on species selection, maybe even write up a management plan.

Evergreen wildlife habitat is a vital component lacking on most properties. Make sure there is no tree canopy over your planting sites, look up before you plant. Since the property was recently logged, look hard to make sure small hardwood seedlings aren't established which will eventually grow up and overtop your conifers. Fertilizer shouldn't be necessary especially if you have half decent soil. Plant a variety of species over a period of years and the task won't be so overwhelming. Keep the seedlings moist, they can dry out and die while held in your hand in a very short period of time on a sunny, windy, low humidity spring day.

Musser Nurseries has already been mentioned and I would also recommend them as a good source for quality seedlings at reasonable prices. I have 40 years of tree planting experience as a forester and will also be glad to help you with any specific questions, feel free to shoot me a PM.
 

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As far as prices...30" 5yo Norways are $1.25 ea (300min), most 4-5yo pines are ~$1.00 (300min), 2yo are .25 (300 min)

Keep spacing further apart than you might think if you want ground cover in years to come. Plant in clusters and lines. Also leave spacing for shooting lanes and food plots.
 

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I planted 3-0 seedlings. They're easy to handle, cost effective, big enough to see yet small enough to easily plant with a planting bar.
I've bought seedlings from Carinos, PGC, Pa bureau of forestry, county conservation district and others in small quantities.
I've planted primarily norway spruce and white pine. I've also planted red pine, white spruce, douglas fir, blue spruce, austrian pine and mugo pine. I've watched 10 inch seedlings turn into twenty foot trees and consider the effort well worth the results.
I've had drought years of near 0 survival and perfect conditions and 80%+ survival. I've seen them destroyed by trespassing ATVs, eaten by deer, used for buck rubs. Everytime I kick a rabbit out, flush a grouse or bounce a deer it lets me feel as though I've made a difference.
 

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Musser or Carino are definitely great nurseries my consulting company refers them a lot. I do not fertilize seedlings. Too much money and not enough results if you are planting more than 50. I like planting white pine or Blue Spruce.
 

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You have gotten some really good advise from the others, thought i might just add a couple other suggestions. When I worked on a Christmas tree farm for several years we got our trees from either Carinos or I believe it was Berkey's out of the erie area. If you are willing to pay a little more (maybe 30 cents) I would consider transplants 2-1 or 2-2. They are a little more hardy and typically have a better survival rate since they have already been moved.

I would echo what red oak said and try contacting whatever government services are available to you before you jump into the bulk of the work. I am sure they could offer you good habitat advise and also point you in the right direction as far as acquiring seedlings at low cost. Good Luck.
 
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