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Has anyone shot a deer through the chest with a crossbow and did not have a blood trail? I shot one this year that I thought I missed. No blood nor fur on the arrow but 2 of the fletchings were ripped off. No blood on the ground. I followed the prints for a while into where I last seen him for about 60 yards and found the deer, dead. No blood trail at all. Shot went through one lung down through the guts and exited low through the opposite rib cage. 4 of us including me looked hard for any blood trail and found none. Body cavity was full of blood when I gutted him. Broadhead is a Slick Trick 100.
 

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I've never shot one with a xbow in the chest but last year I shot one with a 30-06 in the chest and not a single drop of. Blood but the deer was dead within 50 yards.
 

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Your shot placement explains this.

1- shot exited low behind the diaphragm. This means your bolt passed through the viscera ("guts") to get out. There is comparatively little blood back there, and it "wiped" the bolt clean. You almost HAD to punch the liver if you hit lung and then out back farther. If it came out through ribs, however, you didn't go back far enough to hit guts. The diaphragm is attached to the rear/bottom of the rib cage. The diaphragm powers the lungs, which are pressurized, so to speak, and fill the rib cage (thoracic cavity). If you went in and out through ribs you never touched the guts. BUT....going out very low could do the same thing...out through a lot of fat, some muscle, and a lot of hair that could clean off the arrow.

2- no blood....odd, but again, if the exit were behind the diaphragm, I'd expect that. The low exit hole is not open to the blood flow from the lungs. The diaphragm acts as a "dam" of sorts.

3- sounds like the deer checked out before it could bleed out of the mouth from the lung hit. Really strikes me as a gaping liver wound must have occurred, as this would cause MASSIVE bleeding with little on the ground.
 

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Has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes tissue plugs the exit, or the deer dies before blood fills up enough to cause bleeding out of the entrance or mouth.
 

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I shot a buck last year dead center through the heart at 10 yards. Watched him run off and I thought to myself, there is no way I missed. Scoped my arrow from the stand and it was covered in blood. Waited an hour, climbed down and no blood anywhere on the ground, just the arrow. Waited 2 more hours and went to where I last saw him, no blood. I could see where he went from the leaves kicked up. Walked about 10 yards into the golden rods and there he layer stone dead. he went about 75 yards with no blood. When I gutted him, he filled up with blood inside. Very strange. I wasa using Muzzy's.
 

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dpms said:
Has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes tissue plugs the exit, or the deer dies before blood fills up enough to cause bleeding out of the entrance or mouth.
X2
 

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dpms said:
Has happened to me on several occasions. Sometimes tissue plugs the exit, or the deer dies before blood fills up enough to cause bleeding out of the entrance or mouth.

I had this happen to me for the first time this year. Shot a buck with the crossbow, perfect broadside, double-lunger. He took off and ran about 75 yards, and I was pretty sure I saw him drop.

My girlfriend was in a blind across the valley, and she called and asked me if that was me, and I told her yes, and she told me she saw it drop and then it rolled down the hill into the stream bed. After I settled down, I climbed down and could not find my arrow right away, so I started tracking. Not a speck of blood until about 10 yards from where he dropped (before he rolled down the hill), and there wasn't even much blood there. When I walked down the hill to where he stopped rolling, he had a lot of blood coming out of his mouth, and he had a ton of fat in him.

I don't ever remember having such a slim blood trail on a double-lung shot.

I went back the next day and found my arrow, and there was a whole lot of fat on the fletchings too, but hardly any blood. I was very glad that I saw where he dropped because if I didn't, and I had found my arrow right after I shot him, I probably would have waited a couple of hours, or maybe until the next day, thinking it was a less than ideal shot.

Weird.
 
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