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I saw a post in the for sale forum that had 6 walnut trees listed as needing to be taken down and the guy is looking for someone to pay $3500 for them, roughly $600 a tree. This is not intended to start a debate on that post but just that I had no idea they were worth that much. Is that really the going rate for 24-30 inch black walnut trees? I'm only asking as we have quite a few at camp that were planted in the yard generations ago with the thought of selling them down the road and I'm now curious about it. That very well may be accurate, I honestly have no idea but was hoping someone may have more experience with it.
 

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There is a lot of factors that go into determining the value of your trees. If you want a price for your trees I would start with a logging company. Other people may have more insight into who to call.
 

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I've sold walnut that brought in high dollar offers and walnut that they could take or leave. Its all in the quality and size of the trees. Be sure to talk to more than one logger. Id get at least three bids.
 
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One other thing to consider is that a lot of buyers don't want anything to do with "yard trees". There is a walnut in my parents back yard that they called around to see if they could get it taken down for lumber. Only one person came to look at it and walked away promptly. Regardless that this tree was on a field edge until about 15 years ago when the area was developed. I've been told they don't want the risk that someone sunk a nail in it for whatever reason. Not sure if the same would hold true for a camp.
 

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I’ve been running a portable bandsawmill for 20 years. The price of standing timber is less than logs on the ground.
Rough cut lumber is worth more than logs. Kiln dried lumber is worth more than air dried.
You need to talk to a County Forester to get basic information. If you want to do your own research you can make a dollar.
If you want a sure thing hire a consulting forester.

Resource: Forestryforum.com
 

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There is an Amish fella with Horses been loggin in my area just for Walnut the last couple years.I don,t know what he is payin but he is always busy.The logs he takes though are small and short.
 

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I remember being still of Jr. hunter age sitting w/ dad at his Motorcycle Club meeting hearing that the power company was adding additional lines and needed to take down one of the properties black walnuts and they were offering a flat $500.00.

Probably 1966 or 67.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the info guys, it's much appreciated. I'll start doing some digging to see. The trees are healthy and mature but I'd have to get exact measurements. I may just drop them all, limb and top them and see about selling the trunks.
 

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Measure the diameter chest high.
 

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On Walnut, some top quality trees have been going for $6 - $8 ft. in certain areas of the country 20" tree will have around 250 ft. 24" tree will have around 350 ft.


Typically our Pa Walnut seems to go for around $1 to $2 a ft. Ohio, Indiana and Virginia seem to have better quality Walnut than we do.


From my experience, getting bids from mills and loggers will get you anywhere from 25 - 50% of the value. Amish are typically on the low end. Forresters will net you top dollar but you have to pay them a 10% commission. Sometimes more on small jobs.
 

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I am not sure if you are still monitoring this thread but I thought I could provide a little insight.

I am a consulting forester in northeast Ohio (Legacy Land & Wildlife LLC - www.legacylandandwildlife.com) although I grew up in northwest PA in the middle of the Allegheny National Forest. I have worked with several landowners to sell their trees both in a woodland setting and in yards.


The main thing to keep in mind when you are talking about the value of trees is that their are many categories of tree value. One of these is merchantable value. This value is very dynamic. It is not static. The merchantable value of trees fluctuates in a very similar way to the price of stocks. A very large determiner of this value is supply and demand. Also, it certainly depends on what a timber buyer is willing to pay which is directly related to the current value. In addition, certain tree characteristics (diameter, number of clear faces free of knots, merchantable height, and straightness) affect the price as well.


There are more details to consider but this should help in understanding the value of trees.
 
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