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A fisherman off Panama was battling a huge black marlin when the battle took a turn for the worse. The fish sank the boat.

Or as Marlin Magazine put it on its Facebook post, "Marlin Wins!"

Not all the details are in, but apparently the captain began backing down on the huge fish, a common practice in big-game fishing when a fish is taking line. He puts the boat in reverse to chase the fish.


One commenter on Marlin Magazine's Facebook post who apparently had some knowledge of the incident said that the captain fell as he was backing down on the fish at full throttle. The boat took on too much water and, finally, there was no correcting the situation.

Marlin Magazine reported that the boat went to the bottom of the sea and everybody on board was rescued by the photo boat. And, of course, the fish got away.

More photos as the boat sinks and the fish continues to jump:

http://www.grindtv.com/outdoor/blog/5086...hing+like+that/
 

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It was on Good Morning America this morning. The anchorman said the Marlin was back hanging out with his buddies telling them the boat was Thiiiiiiiiisss Biiiiiiigggg !
 

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I seen the picture and the boat is down inside a swell backing into the fish, the way it's angled it looks like the stern is under, but no marlin could pull a stern under like that. It would take tons of force to do that.

Even if your tied in, a line or rod would give out before a fish could pull that boat under.
 

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In 2007 we were backing down on a Blue Marlin in the Washington Canyon. First day of the 2007 White Marlin Open and we only made it to about 50-100 Fathoms because the seas were every bit of 10 feet. The whole week was snotty.

Anyway, we were trying to keep some line on the reel and turned straight into a 10 footer that completely buried the cockpit. Probably 2-3 feet of water back there and I'm still in the chair on the fish. Needless to say, the Captain yells from the bridge: "Well, no more backing down for a while." It took a minute or more for the water to clear out of the scuppers, but it felt like an hour.

You can never tell how rough it is in pictures, but I'm assuming it must have been pretty snotty there and he slipped and kept the throttles pinned, basically burying the stern. Not fun!
 
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