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I'm curious to hover over a piece of ground that adjoins one of the areas we frequently muzz hunt. What is a fairly up to date (not required), yet free (required
) satellite imagery website to use ? Thx much.
 

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I generally use Acme Mapper for satellite imagery. Bing Maps sometimes has some higher resolution maps as well under their "bird's eye" option. The Bing maps seem to be hit or miss in the bird's eye view but I have never seen higher resolution maps than these.
 

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I love using the free maps on mytopo.com. Not only do they allow you to view up to date satellite imagery, but also topographical maps of the area of your choosing, which in my opinion, can be every bit as important at satellite images.
 

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Wiz, I 2nd that about Bing. Also, if you rotate the birds eye view you sometimes get different high res images to see even more features of the land.

Fleroo, check your county courthouse website. They may have a GIS mapping feature. In Cambria County, their GIS site actually has bing satellite overlay and you can see property lines and who the property owners are. Very useful!
 

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Wiz, thanks for the tip on Acme! Quick swiching between topo and satellite and I really like that you can click on a point and immediately see the GPS coordinates.

http://mapper.acme.com/
 

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best imagery is bing in birdseye view
 

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http://www.pennpilot.psu.edu/
This one is updated about a year ago, atleast in NE Bradford. Cool thing is you can find your camp or hunt land as it was in arials from 40's 50's 70's. just click on the ERA box, pick a date then open the map. look for the red dot closest to where you want to look and then the fun begins. No road markings so you need to be familiar with the area and zoom in
 

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They're are more maps on the internet, that the only limitation on public land where you won't go, or where the buddies won't go.

And the internet sure is a lot better than the maps you had to order by mail. Sure good for a lone eagle.
 

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Bates said:
Wiz, thanks for the tip on Acme! Quick swiching between topo and satellite and I really like that you can click on a point and immediately see the GPS coordinates.

http://mapper.acme.com/
I've been using this for years. the sat,teraine and topo really allow one to switch around for a good view of the area. The map also shows the SFL boundaries!
 

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Bates said:
Fleroo, check your county courthouse website. They may have a GIS mapping feature. In Cambria County, their GIS site actually has bing satellite overlay and you can see property lines and who the property owners are. Very useful!
Great tip! Chester County has this function available.
 

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Wild Jager That is an awesome site. My family owns a home of W.Penn family and it is awesome to see the house on aireal photography from the 1930's. Great site
 

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Good post !!!
 

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For those that may have some GIS experience, Quantum GIS is now up and running. From what I hear its supposed to be a great open source alternative to ArcMap.

I'm fortunate to have access to ArcMap which really helps scouting.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Fleroo, check your county courthouse website. They may have a GIS mapping feature.
I have no clue what GIS is. Can you direct me navigationally how to find it on Washington Co. website ? Is it under Tax Records ? Finding a landowner would be useful in some cases.

This apparently is my county website ? http://www.washingtoncourts.us/pages/home.aspx
 

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Fleroo said:
Fleroo, check your county courthouse website. They may have a GIS mapping feature.
I have no clue what GIS is. Can you direct me navigationally how to find it on Washington Co. website ? Is it under Tax Records ? Finding a landowner would be useful in some cases.

This apparently is my county website ? http://www.washingtoncourts.us/pages/home.aspx
GIS = Geographic Information System

You have to understand projections and all kinds of stuff to REALLY understand GIS, thats why people go to college just to deal with it. Polygons wound one direction vs the other, wound counter clockwise for example is a negative polygon, like a pond...

Anyhow, just use google earth or bing and youll get more than enough information. I have been putting mapping to use for years and it in no way shape or form replaces boot work. Youll look at something on one of those programs and think it looks great to get there and find something totally different.

To answer your question, find the property address and call the tax office youll have your answer fast.
 

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Fleroo said:
I have no clue what GIS is. Can you direct me navigationally how to find it on Washington Co. website ? Is it under Tax Records ? Finding a landowner would be useful in some cases.

This apparently is my county website ? http://www.washingtoncourts.us/pages/home.aspx
It doesn't look like Washington County has a GIS mapping site online. If they did, the most likely place for it is the Assessor's page: Washington County Tax Revenue Department


You absolutely do NOT need to have a complex understanding of how GIS works in order to use an online parcel mapping GIS site. If you can navigate Google Earth, you can figure out most county GIS sites pretty easily. You simply pan and zoom on the map viewer until you find the location/parcel that you want, click the "Information" button on the navigation bar (usually a circle with a lower case "i" in it), then click on the parcel. That will give you all the information on the parcel that your particular county provides online. In most counties I've checked, that includes the owner's name and address, at a minimum; some counties provide quite a bit more. Yes, the boundaries shown are approximate, so you shouldn't rely on an assessor's map to find precise boundaries. The assessors' maps ARE a great resource if you want to see approximate property boundaries and find out who owns specific parcels.

If your goal is simply to see the lay of the land in a specific area, look at aerial imagery, etc, then a bunch of the other sites already mentioned are far better resources than the tax map/gis sites, IMO.
 
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