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I just traded my way into a ghost 400. Never had a crossbow before, so i dont know some of the details, I do have a vertical compound.

Anyway, when I got it it came with the same bolts it had when new. The labels were melted or scratched off with no info legible, presumably from being shot through practice targets from the friction. I need to find specs on replacement bolts. I ordered "game crushers", which are the bolts Barnett recommends, but I would like to know if there are any other available/safe/more accurate aftermarket bolts out there.

What would optimal bolt weight be including broad head? I know that the bolt must be a certain weight or heavier to prevent what is essentially considered a dry fire, somewhere above that weight is the perfect bolt weight that will shoot the flattest for the longest distance. Any speculation or even better would be hard mathematical fact about what about should weigh to hit said arc if it began its flight at 407fps and was 22" long....
The short story on this would be that I have a new set of 125Gr. Montec G5's I'd like to use and will need to buy a set of shafts to build said bolt from, and I don't have a clue about which raw shaft to start looking at.

I installed a Barnett cocking crank mechanism, it really makes drawing the string back a breeze. I could see easily decocking, by unwinding it, by backing it down using the winch like cocking mechanism. Anyone see any issues with this? It seems safe in theory.

Anyone else shooting this crossbow? Everything I read about it seems pretty positive, except I read about strings snapping. Is string breakage a common issue with crossbows in general? In this set up the string has to be under great tension and like a bowstring, must be regularly maintained, but after just a few shots, their strings broke. I was thinking of having a custom string built, possibly with a higher thread count, to prevent breaking as easily.

What has everyone heard or experienced pertaining to this crossbow? Looking for a little feedback.:
 

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Try shooting Easton power bolts,ive had goodluck with them and they take a beatening.I shoot three times a week off my Buck commander.As for the cranking device.I took it off my Xbow all they do is cause seperation in you serving,which causes string problems..also you.might want to install alumi nocks in your bolts..ive heard nocks are breaking and causeing dry fireing.
 

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With the Ghost 400 I would try to slow the arrow a little. You will have problems trying to get 400 f.p.s. out of it and still maintain good arrow flight, unless you own a machine shop and know how to tune arrows.

I personally like Victory shafts because of the way they wind the carbon and the wall thickness. They are a very good arrow. Barnett has a minimum of 425 grains listed. I would try to build an arrow with weight of 500 grains for that crossbow. You will also want to use a low profile vane like Norway Fusion in 3 inch. The Ghost takes a 22 inch arrow with moon nocks.

22 inch Victory with a 92 grain brass insert, aluminum moon nock, 3 inch Fusion vanes and a 125 grain head would weigh 472 grains and be just about right. IMO

I've been testing Eason Full Metal Jackets with a weight of 584 grains and I think you would see good results with them as well.

Winding the bow down with the winch is risky. If everything goes as planned it's not a problem. If any part of the process goes wrong you will have a major malfunction, a blown up crossbow and real risk of doing harm to yourself. I would never do it, as I've seen too many broken crossbows as a result of people trying it. Just shoot it into a discharge target to be safe.

Strings- watch your center servings closely. Turn the string so that you can see the part that rides on the barrel deck. When it shows signs of wear, replace them.
 

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DEFINATELY aluminum nocks. That has been the reason behind string problems.
As usual arrowhead is giving great advice on the arrows. Do yourself a favor have him build arrows for your bow, it will save you alot of headaches in the end.
 
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