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The bunny huggers are up in arms in Indiana.....



<span style="font-style: italic"><span style="font-weight: bold">Ind. Officer, Wife Could Face Jail for Saving Deer
..By ABC News</span></span>
.

<span style="font-style: italic">ABC News' Gio Benitez, Mosheh Gains and Emily Stanitz report:

Should an Indiana couple go to jail for saving Bambi?

That's the question surrounding the case of Jeff and Jennifer Counceller, who rescued an injured fawn and nursed it back to health at their Connersville, Ind., home. The couple now faces the possibility of jail time and fines after state officials charged them with a misdemeanor for harboring the animal.


Jeff Counceller, a police officer in Connersville, and his wife were charged with unlawful possession of a deer, a misdemeanor that punished to its fullest extent could put the Councellers in jail for up to 60 days and cost them up to $2,000 in fines.


(ABC News) The couple rescued the deer more than two years ago after finding it on their neighbor's porch. The Councellers said the deer had sustained injuries, and they wanted to nurse it back to health.

"I could feel all of the open wounds all along her back side and she wouldn't stand up," Jennifer Counceller told ABC News.

They brought the deer home and named her Little Orphan Dani.

The Councellers said an Indiana Conservation Officer stopped by their home and discovered the deer this past summer. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources wanted to euthanize Dani, saying she might be dangerous and a threat to people.

"I was devastated. I spent a year and several months nursing her into adulthood, getting to the point where she was able to go out on her own," Counceller said.

On the day Dani was to be put down, the Councellers said she inexplicably escaped from their backyard. Even though Dani disappeared back into the wild, the Councellers' legal problems didn't go with the fawn.

The Indiana Department of Natural Resources said it couldn't comment on pending litigation but that it did discourage people from taking in injured wildlife. This case could go to court next month, and if charges aren't dropped, it will be left for a jury to decide whether the Councellers broke the law.

"No matter what the law is, we did what was right for the animal," Counceller said.

Meanwhile, the story has caused uproar on the Internet. A Facebook support page has more than 6,400 "Likes" in support of the couple. An online petition to drop the charges already has more than 3,800 signatures.

Rick on Change.org wrote, "An act of humanity should not be rewarded with a sentence."

Michelle on Facebook wrote, "They are being punished for having compassion and showing kindness."

The Councellers' case could go to court next month.</span>
 

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Yep, the irrational, we got to kill it to save it.

Which when compared to the no you can't kill that auto hit deer with three broken legs and it's guts hanging out, you have to wait 30 minutes for a WCO to do it.

That said, these folks didn't just nurse the deer back to health, they kept it, didn't notify authorities, etc.

Having bottle fed and raised a doe fawn LEGALLY, the doe's are extremely docile. Followed me around the barn and farm, liked to be brushed, napped on the porch with the dog. Liked ginger snaps. Better mannered than most goats.

I am also puzzled by the comment, that the woman could"feel" the open wounds. Is she blind? She couldn't see them?
 

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been there done that. thankfully our wco at the time just gave me a talkin' to, and took the fawn (who's mom was road killed) to a rehabilitator. did let me know not to do it again.
 

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yes, I know it's against the law to keep a wild animal but if they had nursed it back to health and let it go I would be OK with that. BUT they kept it for a year and a half.
 

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It was indeed wrong to possess the deer and not report it to the responsible wildlife agency. Possibly they could have had the deer moved to a trained wildlife rehab person/facility who could have gotten the deer to the point where it was returned to it's rightful place in nature.

Once the deer is tame, it's basically a pet and will be more challenged to survive in the wild. They learn a lot while being raised in the wild. A buck with antlers could be VERY dangerous in the rut, a doe itself isn't completely harmless, it takes a knowledgeable person to deal with it safely.

As Zimmerstuzen shared, it can be done, but I'm pretty confident that he knows his ways around animals. Everyone does not have that kind of knowledge and experience.

It was a good deed to save the animal. Once the situation was uncovered, too bad it wasn't more of a cooperative effort between the citizens and game officials to find a common solution, as by that time the deer was beyond a return to the wild. No way a deer that old, raised by humans by hand, has the skills to survive in the wild all by itself, hunters, coyotes, and cars.

Perhaps this deer could have gone to a nice zoo or wildlife refuge where non-hunters might have been able to view it and experience it, and maybe learn a little about game management and game laws.

As it "mysteriously" escaped into the wild, someone got some easy, well fed jerky, and if they hunted legally, well, good eatin' for them.
 

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Ok, other side of the argument - let's all go catch some pretty little Dani's, cuz we all know what is best for them, and they're cute and cuddly, and soon all the deer herd in PA will be personal possessions. Anybody seeing why the law is there yet???

At least a rehab'er will raise it separated from humans so as to release it such that it will try live in the wild. This one probably was walking in on a hunter or coyote right after if got released, and right before it died. People are selfish idiots - let 'em alone - they're not pets.
 

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The Yearling was the most recent big book in the house, read by the ten year old and that does not end well for the deer
. There is a lot of encroachment and not enough education around here. I know people who feed wild animals in their yard in urbanized areas with no clue as to how it affects the animal population or poses a risk to humans. I am starting to think the wildlife rehab people are part of the problem, at least here in the city, not sure in other places. A center near us will take pigeons, lots of different kinds of common animals, no matter how invasive. The culture of rehab has presented a way towards encouraging people to not accept death by injury as part of the natural world. I don't like to see suffering in animals but I can see how people could be conditoned to feel like any death of an animal unless of old age is unacceptable. At the same time, policy should encourage humane handling of animals, but it should not go so far as to have people think all suffering can be prevented with human intervention.
 

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Thats what our society has become,punish the good,reward the bad,is there any common sense left?
 

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WestPhillyFam said:
I am starting to think the wildlife rehab people are part of the problem, at least here in the city, not sure in other places.

The culture of rehab has presented a way towards encouraging people to not accept death by injury as part of the natural world.

.... but it should not go so far as to have people think all suffering can be prevented with human intervention.
Just be careful there, not all animal rehab entities lean towards "PETA-ish" attitudes.

Some can really help the animal heal in a way that allows that animal to be returned to the wild. This takes a lot of expertise and skill and is not for amateurs.

Car injuries, animals hit by boat propellers, wounded by ignorant ying-yangs, or covered in spilled oil are not really part of the "natural" world.

I saw up close what some of those turtle people do in Florida, it's not about "Bambi" or tree-hugging. They help the animal get well with the full intent of returning it to the wild and then it's up to nature. The professionals and volunteers are not vegans, anti-hunting, or anything like that as their primary motive. Same with some of the dolphin people at the Research Center.

They are more like paramedics for animals, with the intent of getting them home as a wild animal, not as a tamed pet.

I don't doubt that some of the "rehabbers" are some who have the so-called Disney-fied view of the animal kingdom. But that's not all of them, far from it.

Those people with backgrounds in biology and animal science understand the ways of the wild. After all, if "Bambi" were just a purely truthful story, Mr. Owl would kill and eat Thumper. That's what owls do.
 

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DethFrumAbuv said:
WestPhillyFam said:
I am starting to think the wildlife rehab people are part of the problem, at least here in the city, not sure in other places.

The culture of rehab has presented a way towards encouraging people to not accept death by injury as part of the natural world.

.... but it should not go so far as to have people think all suffering can be prevented with human intervention.
Just be careful there, not all animal rehab entities lean towards "PETA-ish" attitudes.

Some can really help the animal heal in a way that allows that animal to be returned to the wild. This takes a lot of expertise and skill and is not for amateurs.

Car injuries, animals hit by boat propellers, wounded by ignorant ying-yangs, or covered in spilled oil are not really part of the "natural" world.

I saw up close what some of those turtle people do in Florida, it's not about "Bambi" or tree-hugging. They help the animal get well with the full intent of returning it to the wild and then it's up to nature. The professionals and volunteers are not vegans, anti-hunting, or anything like that as their primary motive. Same with some of the dolphin people at the Research Center.

They are more like paramedics for animals, with the intent of getting them home as a wild animal, not as a tamed pet.

I don't doubt that some of the "rehabbers" are some who have the so-called Disney-fied view of the animal kingdom. But that's not all of them, far from it.

Those people with backgrounds in biology and animal science understand the ways of the wild. After all, if "Bambi" were just a purely truthful story, Mr. Owl would kill and eat Thumper. That's what owls do.
Oh, I don't disagree with you at all - I think it's a mostly unintentional consequence and maybe an education gap about where it's appropriate to step in. The rehab folks here are doing everything right. It's not a bad thing, per se, but can be taken too far if interpreted in the wrong way. Maybe I'm just annoyed about people feeding raccoons and pigeons in the city
 
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