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Discussion Starter #1
What's everyone's feelings on this?

I think there was a thread about this several months ago.

How fast does it grow, how high, wide, etc...

Who sells it?

Here's my latest idea:

My entrance road to my cabin has wild rose and untamed brush and briar on both sides of the road. Just a couple trees stand alone amongst the brush as well.
From my property line to the cabin is approx. 75-100 yards. My ideas are to cut down the brush but leave the few trees in place but replant something in place of the brush, Thinking Autumn Olive.
Looking for something to fill in thick and tight on both sides of my road driving in that looks nice but also beneficial in a way.
The actual length of planting area I looking at is about 50 yards on both side of the road.

Pro and Cons?
 

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The pro is quite a few critters benefit from it.
The con is it spreads like crazy and in some cases takes over.In your case I would suggest some type of pine tree or leyland cypress.
 

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Don't plant it. yes, it's beneficial, but there are other alternatives.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
It spreads that fast?
I can't plant any type of tree that grows tall as my electric service runs overhead so I'm looking to stay with a bush type of plant.
PPL came down and really butchered the existing trees that was there.

Leyland Cypress, that resembles American Arborvitae, doesn't it?
My neighbor that borders me planted many of them (American Arborvitae) a couple years ago. The deer totally destroyed each and every one of them in the winter.
 

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It is an invasive exotic species, wherever you plant it, it will spread and dominate the native species. It greens up earlier than natives and this contributes to it shading out a variety of other native and beneficial understory vegetation. Studies have also shown that autumn olive clusters contain far fewer insects than native species. The problem is that the early greening induces early bird nesting but that causes a higher mortality rate in the nests due to lack of insects for food. The native trees green out later when the weather is more conducive to the presence of insects and for whatever reason our insects just prefer the native growth better. Everything out there is part of the ecosystem and this tree does not belong in ours.

EFFECTS OF INVASION: Both autumn olive and Russian olive are very troublesome invasive species; their nitrogen-fixing root nodules allow them to thrive in poor soils. Typical habitats are disturbed areas, roadsides, pastures, and successional fields in a wide range of soils. They are drought tolerant and often invade grasslands and sparse woodlands. Neither species does well in densely forested areas, but Russian olive can be found in moist soils, and does particularly well in sandy floodplains. Both species create heavy shade that suppresses shorter plants requiring direct sunlight.
 

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Yep. Like I said, don't plant it.

Ok, PA-Guy is gonna come on and say to plant it, but, if you don't have any in your area, DON'T PLANT IT.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
okay, besides the Autumn Olive, what other type of bush is similar?
10' or so. but would grow tight together but not so invasive.
 

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Cow , I have property at the falls bridge on rt. 92 I bought 18 months ago. I would be happy to show you a 6 acre patch of ao , out of control. In the winter , it is useless, I can see 200 yards through it.. but You cant move in it now. pm me I'll give you a tour.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
CROW MASTER said:
Cow , I have property at the falls bridge on rt. 92 I bought 18 months ago. I would be happy to show you a 6 acre patch of ao , out of control. In the winter , it is useless, I can see 200 yards through it.. but You cant move in it now. pm me I'll give you a tour.
Crow, how far from the bridge? My dad has a place there too.
 

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Some shrubs that are native and don't spread like wildfire are:

American Hazelnut, Arrowwood, Nannyberry, silky dogwood, red osier dogwood(any dogwood is good) plus a whole host of others I can't think of right now.

The PGC sells many of these in the spring as well as a lot of commercial nurserys. Just don't plant Autumn Olive.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
CROW MASTER said:
I am right at the bridge, from pittston, when you cross the bridge, I own the mountain right in front of you.
Okay, know exactly. My dad's place is 1/4 mile before the bridge, Susquehanna Beach Drive.
 

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Dutch said:
Yep. Like I said, don't plant it.

Ok, PA-Guy is gonna come on and say to plant it, but, if you don't have any in your area, DON'T PLANT IT.
Hey Dutch, how did you know??


It will mature out at 12 - 15 feet. Staying well within you limits for the electrical wires.

Lets see..... Bears think the berries are candy. Turkeys, grouse, all birds, eat the berries. Deer will browse on it. I've even watched the squirrels after the berries.
It can be planted thick. Space them about 8 feet apart if you want them real thick.
Hardy... yes very hardy.
If you go look at some other threads we have had here, you'll see some pictures of mine.
I've been planting it, off and on, for about 25 years or so.
It does require sunlight. If you are planting it in a heavily wooded/shaded area, it might not grow real well.

The light colored bushes are autumn olive, the darker trees behind it is young pines and spruce. The deer like to lay under the pines, right next to the autumn olive.
 

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That is the problem. All of those critters eat the fruit and spread seeds to places where native vegetation can not compete and natural succession is supressed.
 

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If you shop around, you get get them as seedlings for a decent price. Somewhere about 50, for about $80.00
 

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Hey Dutch, how did you know??
Just a wild guess? LOL

I will not argue that it does provide cover and berries for critters, not one bit. But, like others have said, at this point, there are alternatives.

Also, as I said, if Cowdawg doesn't have it in his area, he shouldn't plant it and release the scourge on his neighbors.
 

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Enrique', stop making sense here!
 

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LOL, it sure does.

I promise, thats the last you'll hear if from me, but I don't think it's the last you'll hear it.
 
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