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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put alot of miles on the truck the last couple months. And I have a bunch of properties I'd like to ask permission to bow hunt deer. I googled what to do and not do. But I know many of you guys have already have experience with knocking. Is there any advice any one could give me I'm new to all this please keep the ..... comments to your self. I've put it alot of time and miles scouting and such not asking for anyone's spots or anything just on dos and donts when it comes to asking is there a good time to go? Any advice is much appreciated.

<span style="font-weight: bold"> Abreviated swearing is covered under the rules....Please read & abide by them.....Thanks</span>
 

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I have always heard that getting permission around the Philly area is very tough due to the limited hunting area available, (and that may not be correct, but that is what I have heard).

I would think that areas where you see a big garden or a lot of flowers could indicate areas where deer are considered pests and not the "purty little deer" that some think they are.

With that said, be polite, and respectful, dress nicely, offer info like truck tag or cell # so the landowner can get in touch with you if there is a problem. Offer to "keep an eye" on their property for them. Expect to knock on a lot of doors to get that one honey hole, and good luck!
 

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Takemrarely said:
With that said, be polite, and respectful, dress nicely, offer info like truck tag or cell # so the landowner can get in touch with you if there is a problem. Offer to "keep an eye" on their property for them. Expect to knock on a lot of doors to get that one honey hole, and good luck!
Lots of good advice there. I'll add; try not to show up at mealtimes and don't wear camo. At that point, you're a salesman, and you're selling yourself. I make up index cards with my personal info as well as my truck info, and give it to the person regardless whether I get permission or not. Tell them you would be willing to help out with some chores if needed, (and then make sure you DO). If you have any permissions from anybody else nearby, make sure you "name-drop" a little. Even though the landowner doesn't know anything about you, he knows and USUALLY respects his neighbors, so the fact that one of them trust you might swing things your way. Make sure to stress how much you are a law abiding, respectful hunter, but don't blow your own horn and tell them how many deer you kill and how great you are.

If you get turned down, continue to be polite and leave your card with them, asking that they give you a call if they change their mind after thinking about it. You might think that's a waste of time, but it's not.

If you DO get permission, make sure to keep on your promise to help out. DON'T wait for him to call, just stop by occasionally and see if he's doing something you can help with and jump right in. Treat his property as if it's your own. Either during the season, after the season, or both, make sure to drop in with a gift of some sort. Restaurant, grocery, or gas certificates are always good, venison products will never get turned down, maybe a turkey or ham from a local market. If you really wanna impress, have some flowers sent to the wife. Make sure to include a note so they know who it's from, and thank them for the privilege of hunting his land.
 

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I also spend alot of time scouting and knocking on doors. My advise is dress appropriate, clean shaved appearance and don't wear your hunting camo. Indroduce yourself with a handshake and be polite. Another thing alot of your bigger farms or propertys the owners get asked alot and you are less likely to gain permission. Concentrate on the smaller woodlots for bowhunting.
 

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I get hounded every year, yet nobody has ever offered anything. So in turn, they get the "maybe next year" attitude.

Do you guys really think that people should let you hunt free of charge for something they've worked so hard for?

Come barring an envelope full of cash and I'm sure you'll have no issues.
 

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Good thing there arent a lot of landowners with your attitude out there. I have permission to hunt a few places and all I have offered is help with things and yes a gift or 2 shows appreciation as well. Not all landowners are selfish or greedy same as all hunters arent slobs or looking for a free ride.
 

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In the philly area the people that own significant land do not need or want money. If they did they would sell to a developer. It is all about relationships and timing. I get on land through getting on one property and then becoming frinds with the landowner over time. Word of mouth leads me to hunt the adjoining parcels. Many times it is luck where there just kicked someone else off. Many times it is the ex. Son inlaw.
 

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BassBlaster said:
I get hounded every year, yet nobody has ever offered anything. So in turn, they get the "maybe next year" attitude.

Do you guys really think that people should let you hunt free of charge for something they've worked so hard for?

Come barring an envelope full of cash and I'm sure you'll have no issues.
I would like to take this moment to publicly thank everyone and anyone that allows people permission to hunt without looking for a payment. Their generosity in sharing what they've worked so hard for allows alot of us the ability to get out there and enjoy hunting. For alot of us cannot afford to make rental payments in order to gain access. So with that I thank all those landowners with neighborly attitudes for allowing someone access to their property. Without them there never would have been a hunting tradition for the majority of us.

And to those with such permission, thank the owner yourself and treat their property with more respect than you treat your own. Or else someday you might have to start making payments to enjoy your past time.
 

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Dale Sholder said:
Good thing there arent a lot of landowners with your attitude out there. I have permission to hunt a few places and all I have offered is help with things and yes a gift or 2 shows appreciation as well. Not all landowners are selfish or greedy same as all hunters arent slobs or looking for a free ride.
How do you figure? From your point of view, assuming you own no land of your own, land owners should open their land up and allow access to people whom they may not even know? Doesn't that defeat the sole purpose of purchasing land to begin with?

If you turn the table and look at it from the land owner's perspective you may realize that selfishness has nothing to do with it. Especially an owner that hunts the particular property to which you're inquiring about. In today's age, with as many sue happy individuals as there are, I'd say any land owner that allows strangers to run around their land with weapons is just crazy.
 

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Dont make the landowner walk over to where you have pulled up with a four wheeler. That is definitely a permission killer for me. Some folks do not like four wheelers on thier property. Here is another permission killer" I have been up here for twenty years and never had a problem" My reply, " I did not own the property then so I suggest you leave"
 

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Bassblaster, if you accept envelopes full of money to hunt your ground you are removing the state protection from being sued should something happen to the hunter or someone else. To the OP, when you go out to knock on doors, don't go in dirty work clothes, or hunting clothes. Wear nice clean clothes and be groomed. Be polite offer the land owner your name address and phone number. As was already stated you could offer to do some work but let the situation determine what you will do. Do not bother the land owner when they are in the fields working or in the barn milking etc. Most of all, if denied, be polite and thank them for their time, that could pay off down the road. In short, look and act like someone the land owner would want on their land.
 

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i own some property, and i get asked alot. no problem, everyone needs a place to hunt. but theres no sense in giving everyone permission cuz nobody enjoys hunting in a crowd. dads with kids get priority here, lots of kids have taken their first buck here. there was about 80 turkeys in my front feild most of the winter, so i'm getting asked about that right now, but theres already 4 or 5 guys that hunt them here, so i don't let anyone else in unless one of those guys isn't coming this year.

i hunt in ohio alot, so i have to ask permission there. i just drive in, find someone to talk to & have at it. honestly, i'm about 50% getting permission there. and iv'e got so many good propertys i'll probably never hunt them all. iv'e killed dozens of bucks over there, but only 2 off the same farm. finding new propertys is almost as much fun as hunting, and iv'e made alot of friends in the process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just want to say thank you for all the advice this far. I'm a very social person. This is just intimidating being this up coming season will only be my second season hunting and last year didnt go much. The guy I know who has permission is really shady and don't drive so I only got the invite when he had no other ride. Just learning on the fly if you will. Thanks again
 

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I've been on both sides of the door on this topic. I never took with me anything other than a straight-forward respect for the land owner and his land to get permission. I, in turn, expect the same from someone seeking permission.
First impressions mean a lot. If a stranger were seeking permission and lived in the area I would actually like to see them start small. Ask permission to hunt woodchucks or squirrels. Maybe just stop initially to pay a compliment and take a step toward establishing a relationship. Understand your customer. Bringing me an envelope of cash or a gift would require you to have a really deep pocket to even begin to influence the conversation(and it still wouldn't). A token of apprciation afterward is a different discussion.
 

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No one says you have to allow anyone on to hunt but denying everyone smacks of greed. No I dont own land grew up and still live in a rural area. I had permission to hunt most of the land around here . Always asked every year and was told numerous times that I didnt have to ask but I wasnt raised that way. I lost access to a lot of the ground I hunted due to the older folks dying off and the land being sold. I asked politely and was told no that they were going to be on it. I have no problem with that but in the same vein was told I could hunt archery just not rifle or if rifle season not the first week or Saturdays. I have no problem with landowners asking me that. In the end to each his own you have your reasons and while I dont agree with your attitude its yours.
 

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BassBlaster said:
I get hounded every year, yet nobody has ever offered anything. So in turn, they get the "maybe next year" attitude.

Do you guys really think that people should let you hunt free of charge for something they've worked so hard for?

Come barring an envelope full of cash and I'm sure you'll have no issues.
Suggestion #1 don't ask this guy...
 

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Sometimes, it may be tough to get a in touch with the owner, they aren't home, etc. I have had success writing a nice, handwritten letter explaining what I was looking for (permission to archery hunt, turkey hunt, whatever), giving them my contact info. (cell phone only), and including a stamped, self-addressed envelope and a permission slip form where they could sign their name and date it. I also offer to meet them in person at a place of their choosing that way if they are on the fence, they can meet me. I have had success asking for permission this way.
But, my best success has just been via word of mouth.
 

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Take off your sunglasses.
Don't use words like whack & stack, greenfield, Nugent or NRA.
Might help to wear a seed corn cap.


I seldom turn down a deer hunter as I want the things killed but do have two guys who farm the place that have hunted here since they could hunt....I consider them in the allowance.
I don't worry too much...it's just deer.
Turkeys a bit different as the safety factor enters.

I never would take money or Lease, as the concept has ruined much hunting for many folks in the East....as well as negatively impacted some game species.
Locate, Lease & Lock Up.....popular only in the Land of the Selfin, as my dad would have said.
 
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