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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
..............

The Game Commission basically already allows licensed hunters to shoot as many hogs as they want, whenever they want, in the wild.

(The exception is in areas where the PGC sets up an operation to trap wild hogs.)

So the agency is doing the most it can to rid the state of hogs once they are roaming the countryside.

However, in the past, the agency has contended that one way hogs have gotten into the wild is by escaping from hunting preserves. There are about 25 such places across the state.

So beginning July 1 — assuming the proposed new rules are passed — it would be illegal to import "feral swine" or "wild boar" into Pennsylvania.

And then, as of July 1, 2014, it would be illegal to possess "feral swine" or "wild boar" in the state.

If you can't have them, you can't collect money from folks who want to shoot them.

"This is major," Commissioner Jay Delaney told Pennsylvania Outdoor News earlier this month. "There will be no more feral swine canned hunts in Pennsylvania."

Not so fast, Mohr says.

If someone like Mohr breeds and raises his own hogs in captivity for use in a hunting preserve, can that hog be considered "feral" or "wild"?

Or is it just a domestic hog?

"In my mind, that's a domestic hog that the Game Commission has no say about whatsoever," Mohr said. "It's an animal regulated by USDA and the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture."

The Game Commission defines "feral swine" and "wild hog" in this manner, according to spokesman Jerry Feaser:

"Feral swine is any pig released into the wild or existing in the wild from a domestic stock.

"There are many species, such as Eurasian boar, that clearly are wild boars.

"However, there are numerous hybrids thereof that also would be classified as wild boars regardless of whether it was born in captivity.

"This is similar to the Game and Wildlife Code's definition of exotic wildlife that includes any hybrid, regardless of the percentage of a particular exotic species, such as wolf hybrids."

Delaney conceded the issue is not clear-cut.

"I think the courts will be involved at some point to answer that question" about what is and what isn't a wild hog, he said.

Mohr agrees the courts likely will be involved if the game commissioners approve the proposed rules.

And maybe even the Legislature.

"This is not going to go down without a fight," he said.

As for his own operation, Mohr said he has no intention of removing hogs from the list of species he offers to hunters.

"As long as [the hogs are] on my private property, the Pennsylvania Game Commission will have nothing to say about it," he said.



http://lancasteronline.com/article/local/804808_The-battle-over-wild-boars.html
 

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Yea, this one is going to be a fight. There are many folks whose livelyhoods depend on pig hunting in controlled settings in this state. Just as with the other exotic species that are hunted within these properties.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I have long held that the hogs and all exotics should be microchipped and or tattooed inside the lip. Add huge fines for any escape or release and stringent reporting and accountability. As with the deer farms, double fencing should also be required.

Having them totally gone wouldn't break my heart. My guess is these businesses are a second income for most, not a full time livelihood.
 

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JMO
As i continue to hear people complain about loseing there rights there seem to be some that are ok with the pgc doing just that to a certain segment of business people , WHATS NEXT
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This one is easy.

People, and according to some the majority of hunters, complain about no deer. Hogs, a non- native species, can cause real havoc and habitat degradation that will impact deer and other wildlife numbers quickly.


Remember, a judge assigned the GC responsibility for hogs in a lawsuit. Even though the statute clearly assigned it to Department of Ag. However, I do expect the hog hunt folks to petition the legislature to place them under Ag again just like the deer farmers did - for the same reason. The GC was to rough on them.

Hogs can produce two to three litters of 12 to 14 piglets a year. Do the math for a dozen hogs over one year, two out to ten years.

Eradication is the answer here. This is not a species we want or need in this state. PA complicates that by not being flat land - so the dreams of home grown copper hog shoots are out.


There are several widely distributed areas with hog populations now. By mistake or accident, they got lose and now are populating and destructing wildlife habitat and farm land.


If not a outright ban, reg's need to be in place to assign absolute accountability for escapee's and then assign HUGE fines for it.

It is called the price of doing business. As such - there is insurance - but even the insurance companies will insist on very stringent measures to prevent any escapes.
 
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