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Surely you have heard stories of people buying a Kiyak taking it out the first evening in the Susquehanna River and drowning.. I just heard this happen in the Harrisburg area this Spring..
Also Trout fishing at Possum Lake in Cumberland county (when it was open). I saw it happen twice.. People fishing in Canoes (Aluminum).
Things turned over and both people near drowned...They lost all of their fishing equipment...
Aluminum Canoes? are they just prone to this? If someone uses a aluminum canoe on a lake the odds are they going to flip it...I would just be concerned that when people buy a canoe and they have a young child in it..That they are not ignorant. I know I would never take my 4 year old grand child out in a Canoe yet.
Now I do have a boat...Almost a Canoe.. It's a Coleman Scanoe...I have had it since 1984 and I have never turned it in a lake or stream.. See it has a rib on it's keel and it 's quite wide and grips the water.
I have also seen aluminum Canoes with an pontoon attachment that makes it safer..
I have also seen aluminum canoes that are real wide in the center like the Scanoe. It appears they are less prone to flip????
Anyway just wanted people input on what they think about certain types of canoes and how they flip so easy... Is it the canoe or is it the person using the canoe being a bit ignorant and pushing the limitations of the canoe like standing up???
 

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I have an aluminum and really nice wenonah glass canoe. The aluminum is the more stable of the two.
 

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The old Grumman alum canoes had air chambers in the front and rear and a keel. They are just as stable as any other modern canoe w/ a flat bottom.

Flat bottoms have great 'initial' stability and little 'secondary' stability, once turned onto the side they will go over quickly.

Other designs have a rounded bottom that is not a initially stable but the shape of the side give alot more secondary support when rolled over as the shape provides more surface area the further you lean...

It is all subjective. I have a 1958 Old Town wood and canvas canoe w/ 'tumblehome' sides. Horsing around you can tip it in a second Yet I've had it almost fill w/ water while we were kneeling and still did not turn it over. Had we been up on the seats we would have gone over.

If you want to fish from any canoe, get out riggers.
 

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You can always add float bags to the bow & stern for about $50. I drilled hulls in my hull to lace in nylon rope to keep the bags in place.
 

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Stability depends on the design of the canoe. Not whether it is made of aluminum or other materials.

Some canoes (and kayaks) are designed for speed and maneuverablity.

Others are designed more for stability.

You should practice a lot on lakes, to learn how to handle a canoe, before going on a river.
 

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Above all else, don't put someone up front who steers on the wrong side and gets you going sideways into a rock. Don't ask how I know this lol.
 

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When hit by crocodiles, hippos, meteorites, torpedoes...yes.
When you see a big fat wahini on the lake side bending over showing the whole world her cellulite, the shock might make you try to turn the canoe to quickly, hence flipping it. When you accidently paddle into a swarm of gay naked guys splashing and swooshing around, the possibility of flipping the canoe increases. Finally, when a gorgeous curvey young lady in a slingshot bends over to spread a blanket on the lake beach, it could cause tsunamis. That is all.
 

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I grew up with and now it's mine a Mohawk Tripper canoe 18' It is made specifically for whitewater. Smooth flat keelless bottom. Higher sides for more freeboard when loaded up. Awesome on the Pinecreek in springtime or on a cold December lake with whitecaps, a 30 mph crosswind, and 2 dead deer, 2 hunters and their gear for a day . Very very stable. I agree with others tho once it's over it is harder to right side up than a aluminum. Also have a17' Old town Voyaguer I think. Whitewater/ lake canoe mix as this one has a keel. SAme deal tho. HArd to flip but once it's over it's more work than an aluminum to get righted and empty. I have used tons of aluminum ones over the years and yes they seem less stable. They have more rocker built into them which means the bottom is not only more rounded sideways but also front to back. The best thing a person can do is take a Red Cross canoe class. I took my first one when I was 8. If you aren't up for that pick a warm day, head to a lake or pond in shallow water, strap on your PFD and roll that sucker over a few times so you get the feel for it. Best to do it in a controlled situation and know whats up then when you aren't ready for it and gotta figure it out on the fly when you and maybe your familiys lives are at stake! I don't think it has as much to do with how "tippy" a canoe is versus knowing your boat and how to handle yourself. Look at those Cajuns. They stand up poling those shallow skinny pirogues thru snake and croc infested water like we walk on solid ground. They just have a lot of practice and know their gear.
 

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Featherduster said:
I grew up with and now it's mine a Mohawk Tripper canoe 18' It is made specifically for whitewater. Smooth flat keelless bottom. Higher sides for more freeboard when loaded up. Awesome on the Pinecreek in springtime or on a cold December lake with whitecaps, a 30 mph crosswind, and 2 dead deer, 2 hunters and their gear for a day . Very very stable. I agree with others tho once it's over it is harder to right side up than a aluminum. Also have a17' Old town Voyaguer I think. Whitewater/ lake canoe mix as this one has a keel. SAme deal tho. HArd to flip but once it's over it's more work than an aluminum to get righted and empty. I have used tons of aluminum ones over the years and yes they seem less stable. They have more rocker built into them which means the bottom is not only more rounded sideways but also front to back. The best thing a person can do is take a Red Cross canoe class. I took my first one when I was 8. If you aren't up for that pick a warm day, head to a lake or pond in shallow water, strap on your PFD and roll that sucker over a few times so you get the feel for it. Best to do it in a controlled situation and know whats up then when you aren't ready for it and gotta figure it out on the fly when you and maybe your familiys lives are at stake! I don't think it has as much to do with how "tippy" a canoe is versus knowing your boat and how to handle yourself. Look at those Cajuns. They stand up poling those shallow skinny pirogues thru snake and croc infested water like we walk on solid ground. They just have a lot of practice and know their gear.
Well said and good advise.

speaking of Cajuns, the Maine guides stood and poled wood and canvas canoes upstream! Old canoes w/ 1/2 ribs bewteen the steam bent cedar ribs made it easier to stand but it is a challenge...
 

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Personal experience I have found it has more to do with how high you sit in the canoe than the material the canoe is made out off. When looking for a canoe I would make sure you get one in which you sit lower in that way the center of gravity is closer to the water and therefore more stable. Bottom line practice and be careful and always wear a life vest. Wis Bang said it best "know your equipment"
 
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