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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just curious, for nightime coyote hunts, or other pesky varmints that may only come out in the dark, anyone ever toss in some tracers sprinkled in the mag?

If you did, how'd that go?
 

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I doubt they would shoot to the same point of aim as your hunting bullet and at least the MOA accuracy needed for varmints. Tracers are not accurate.

And then you have the possibility of fire, not good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Good to know. Never tried any, just wondered how they shot. Never thought of setting the field on fire.

And, I don't advocate dumping a mag. But, say a group, a pack, a gaggle of varmints showed up, we were shooting the bull and got to wondering if anyone used a tracer every 3rd or 4th round just to see better the line of fire.

So only a curiosity question. We adhere to the "One Nosler Partion, One Dead Varmint" philosophy to the greatest extent possible. 😁
 

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If you look in the regulations, I'm willing to bet you'll find that tracer ammunition is illegal to use for hunting.

I know my gun club, and I suspect most gun clubs, have range rules prohibiting using tracers on their ranges. Fire hazard, you know. So, since there's no opportunity to practice with them on a range, there's no opportunity to see how accurate they are, or are not. Granted, the whole purpose* of tracer ammunition is to let the shooter see where his bullets are going, so their ballistics are similar to ball ammo. But the ball ammo is FMJBT. If you're not sighted in with FMJBT, whatever tracers you use will be off target, too. *(Secondary purpose: load 3 at the bottom of the magazine, to remind you it's time to change magazines. Schools of thought differ on this application.)

Finally, speaking from the experience of having run more than a few ranges during my military service, you would be astonished to watch where tracers wind up. If you miss the target and there's anything downrange to deflect them, they'll go zooming off into the night in the mode of "I shot an arrow in the air, it fell to earth I know not where". You can get away with that on a military post, where the whole center of the post is an impact area. But no way you can get away with that on civilian ranges, where you either hit and stay in the berm, or go off-property. And, to run those military ranges, we still had to have fire suppression equipment available. Nothing fancy, but enough to put out the inevitable brush fires.

Oh, yeah: watching firing on a night machinegun range through AN/PVS-5 NVG is really cool. Real light show.

If you're going to hunt, use proper hunting ammo.
 
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If you look in the regulations, I'm willing to bet you'll find that tracer ammunition is illegal to use for hunting.
Man...they take the fun outta everything.

what about placing some tannerite next to a woodchuck hole. when the chuck pops up, shoot the tannerite, i think that would be a blast :)

i watched the knob creek machinegun shoots on u tube, people own all that stuff too...WOW

 

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Had some vietnam vintage 5.56 but gone now. Fun but no hunting use. We loaded as the 29th round, 2nd going in, heads up there was 1 left when you saw it rather than waiting for the bolt lock and pulling on nothing.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Some interesting insights, thanks for the info.

To reiterate, no intent to break any rules or ethics. The topic of night shooting was the beer conversation, and the question of tracers came up. Turns out no one had ever fired one.

Gotta think it would be a cool light show, but the safety concerns of fires or strays is duly noted. 👍🏻
 

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Tracers are not very accurate, nor do they need to be. With the exception of sniper work, in a combat situation the object is not closely aimed fire but to lay down a collective "field of fire", so tracers merely help to keep sustained fire in the "field". One reason tracers aren't inherently accurate is that as the incendiary in the round is consumed, the round becomes lighter the further down range it travels.

The Milspec for M62 tracer rounds is no wider than 36 inches at 550 yards... that's a pretty large group. ;)
 

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I set the woods on fire once when I was 17 shooting 30-06 tracers out of a 1903 Springfield at 600 yards on a friends property. Now I only shoot them when it rains and the last time I did so was right at dark, the tracer landed in the corn and lit it up so bright I thought I set the field on fire again.
 
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