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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was curious, if anyone on here is buying/buys standing timber. I've had some trees scaled in venango county. Total volume is approx. 43,000 ft. If interested, contact me and I can give you the exact figures on species and volume.
 

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If you already have the trees cut and skidded to a landing, you might want to try Mervin Wenger or Scott Pettite.


Do you know what species and grade?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The trees are still standing, had a forester scale, mark and measure. So yes, I have a detailed list so to speak. Putting it out for bid. Thanks
Please pm for contact info, and detailed list (if interested) Richland twp. veango county Emlenton area
 

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PA Logger may be interested. It could be a little far tho. I'll give him a call and have him check this thread out.
 

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It's really hard to direct you in the right direction without knowing grade and species composition.

In that area, I'd consider Endeavor, Mattson, Stechs and Brush run. Couple other specialized mills but it all depends on what you have. Not sure which mills are full of logs which also makes a difference.


For reference, prices should be around the following:


Red Oak(1) $.75 ft
Soft Maple(1) $.60 ft
Cherry(1) varies $1 - 1.30 ft Some places higher
Blocking $.25 ft


We've had a good bump in timber prices recently but we're still not where we were at before 2007/8.

Good luck.
 

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Huntin.......You should probably contact Hickman Lumber and Lapinski, both located on 208 east of Clintonville. They are the power in your area... Also might try Fulton Bros in Shippenville. And Allegheny Wood products from Marble PM me if I can be of more help...
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Spoke with Lipinski today. Seems like a stand up guy. As far as timber, he said that he's overloaded for the next two months.
Thanks
 

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I can give you a number of a Timber Buyer from Punxy that I used. I sent out a bib perspective like you did and received 4 bids from it. I rejected them all as they were lowball. The fella from Punxy more than doubled the highest bidder. PM me if you need a name.
 

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I had three folks look at my timber in the past year. Prices seem still too low. Even thouugh I only have 25 acres of woods, there are a good many trees over 24 inches in diameter chest high. (The beech trees stay though.)
 

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I once looked at a 50 acre tract of timber near Oil City that the fella had 17 bids for the timber. Highest bid he had got was $56,000. If he would have sold me the land(fell thru because of his partner), I would have made easily over $100k for the timber.


Bought another piece of land near Tionesta in President township. Land was listed with a realtor and they had several appraisals from some of the bigger local timber companies. High appraisal was around $70,000. Using a forester, we made over $190,000.


I have many more examples but the point is that if you're too cheap to use a forester because you don't want to give them a 10% cut, you're opening yourself up to getting underbid and underbid by a lot.


You're trees so do it how you want but I invest in timberland for a living and I'd bet money you won't get anywhere close to what you could with a forester.


One last bit of advice I'll give you is to never use the blue shirt/straw hat fellas. Most people in the timber business and many landowners who's trees they cut know why.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
rroae, I agree about the forester... I have one, money well spent. "keeps'm honest". If you wouldn't mind, could you pm me some pre-cautions of the straw hats. Neat stuff
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
rroae, thanks for the reference prices. Also, I'm finding there is quite a difference in bids. We're not talking nickles either... more like k's. I understand everyone has different profit margins due to location, and resources... it's amazing what the difference is though.
 

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always hunting said:
rroae, I agree about the forester... I have one, money well spent. "keeps'm honest". If you wouldn't mind, could you pm me some pre-cautions of the straw hats. Neat stuff

I'd really prefer not to get too specific or make generalizations about all of them because there are some truly good straw hat folks but let's just say make sure your trees are triple marked at the base, you have a sediment and erosion plan in place and that you have time to keep a close eye on the work being done. In fact, this should be done with anyone cutting timber. It's just that some see that straw hat and give them more trust than they deserve when in fact, in my personal observations, they have caused more than their fair share of trouble and have left more than a couple beautiful woodlots in shambles.


If you have a good woodlot, what you do today will affect not only your future enjoyment of the land but also will significantly affect your pocketbook. Simple rule - 'low grade today gets you bigger pockets tomorrow'. If you high grade now, you'll probably ruin your woodlot for your lifetime.


I wish Palogger would chime in. He's tremendously knowledgeable from what I've read him post over at the QDMA forums and his advice is top notch.
 

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always hunting said:
rroae, thanks for the reference prices. Also, I'm finding there is quite a difference in bids. We're not talking nickles either... more like k's. I understand everyone has different profit margins due to location, and resources... it's amazing what the difference is though.

Yep


On 26 acre tract of land I had on Walnut Bend near Tionesta, we received bids ranging from $39,000 to $105,000 and everywhere in between. Even when timber folks know everyone will see their bid when the bid envelopes are opened, they still try to 'steal' the timber.


The above spreads are not unusual.
 

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All: There is a little ideosynchrosy that happens with sealed timber bids. The spread will show a standard bell curve with most bids falling somewhere near the mean average. Some higher some lower. The "low ball" bids are ussually placed not to necessarily try to steal the bid, but rather to recievce the results of the bids, so as to see what Clear Lake bid, or just what Allegheny Wood products bid. Happens frequently..
 
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