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Discussion Starter #1
Any body else harvest chaga for tea? My wife and I both have a cup every evening. We both think it does us some good, and it has a tasty earthy flavor.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I never even heard of it. What is it?
Its a mushroom. It grows on birch trees, and cherry trees but that's rare. Its black and rough surface on the outside, light brown and a little softer on the inside. I find it mostly on birch trees growing along streams, or even wet weather drainage. You dry it for a few weeks, I just put mine in paper bags to keep dust off and put it in a dry place. Then to make tea just scrape it with a knife till you have about a teabags worth per cup, boil it on a low setting so it takes a while to boil. Do that in the morning, then in the evening bring to a boil again before you have a cup. If you make several cups worth you can let it set two or three days and just boil it up each night. It reportedly has very good nutrition and is used to help people with illness that cant eat much. In some country's it is used to treat disease. I have no idea if it really has medicinal value. I drink it because its nutritious and it taste good.
 

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I've only had it a couple times. I have some chaga that was given to me years ago, but I am going to harvest some this year. Its growing right behind my house.
 

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I pulled up some images on Google. I don’t know if I’ve seen it before...probably have but didn’t pay attention. I’ll have it on my radar screen now.
 

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I pulled up some images on Google. I don’t know if I’ve seen it before...probably have but didn’t pay attention. I’ll have it on my radar screen now.
You will find it if you look for it. Off hand Id guess maybe 1 in 75 birch trees will have chaga growing on it. And half of them will be low enough to reach. If you do harvest some, don't take it all from the tree. Then it will grow back. Just like ginseng. I've harvested chaga from the same trees many times.
 

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Does anyone know if this stuff causes kidney stones?? I used to be a HUGE iced tea and hot tea drinker. I have gotten kidney stones a couple times in my life but always passed them. In 2016 I had severe problems with multiple large stones and had to have several surgeries and months of agony before I got rid of the problem. My doctor advised me to knock off tea altogether as it was the bulk of my stone problems. I've been looking for a replacement beverage ever since and can't find one that satisfies me. I love iced tea but am not willing to undergo again what I went through in 2016.
 

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Kudu, try wild mint tea. That is my go to in the summer for iced tea. It is also good hot with honey in it. I have a nice patch growing at my place.
 

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Does anyone know if this stuff causes kidney stones?? I used to be a HUGE iced tea and hot tea drinker. I have gotten kidney stones a couple times in my life but always passed them. In 2016 I had severe problems with multiple large stones and had to have several surgeries and months of agony before I got rid of the problem. My doctor advised me to knock off tea altogether as it was the bulk of my stone problems. I've been looking for a replacement beverage ever since and can't find one that satisfies me. I love iced tea but am not willing to undergo again what I went through in 2016.
Im certainly not qualified to give advice about what may cause kidney stones, but I can say that real green or black tea is just that, tea. While you make what is referred to as a "tea" with chaga or as Woods Walker suggested, wild mint,,,it is a brew,,not made from the tea your doctor warned you about.
 

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My Grandmother made tea for us using bee balm. It has a sweet minty taste. Native Americans utilized it also for various medicinal purposes. I keep a big patch of it at my camp. My honeybees love it, and the hummingbirds seem to prefer it over using a store bought feeder.

Woods Walker, I’ll have to try using wild mint next summer. I cultivate a patch of it also.
 

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My brother Got me into drinking Chaga tea. He has his chaga (honey holes) that he likes to go when hunting. He gives me large hunks of it every now and then. I put a chunk in our slow cooker and let it brew. When we want some I just take a cup out of the cooker and add a cup of water back to it. Last a long time that way and always hot.
 

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I plan on trying some just as soon as I find some chaga in the woods. I just haven't found the right tree yet.
The birch trees along creek banks is the best place to look.
 

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my grandmother used to make sassafras tea when i was a kid. gram would have us go out and dig up a couple roots and she would dry them. she would shave some of the root and boil it. add some sugar and it tasted good.
 

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When I was a kid people would go house to house selling sassafras root. About 2" circle 4-5 " long for $ .50 Now they say it's cancerous. It did taste good. It was called a spring tonic.
 

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tenpt, my grandma said she drank it because i was supposed to thin the blood. not sure if that was true but it did taste good.
 
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