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Blacksmithing is one of my many hobbies. I've never made a knife before but I decided to give one a whirl after I completed another project. It's made out of some .5" rebar I had laying around. Crap steel I know but I'll try again with something that will actually hold an edge. It was a fun experiment . This only took me about 10 minutes to make and probably another 20 putting an ok grind/polish on it. Not sure if I'll put a handle on it or not.









 

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I forged one out of a coil spring one time. And didn't get the pitting, gaps or whatever you call it that you see in the photo, using rebar. I put a wood handle on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah there was alot of scale on it. It was the end of the day and my fire was shallow and I was cranking on the air to get the coals hot. Too much oxygen can cause alot of scale or iron oxide.
 

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Nice
 

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That's a good start. Some folks like that forged finish these days.
 

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burninghxcsoul said:
yeah there was alot of scale on it. It was the end of the day and my fire was shallow and I was cranking on the air to get the coals hot. Too much oxygen can cause alot of scale or iron oxide.
looks like a very usable knife, sharpen it and see how well it holds an edge. files make good stock for making knife blades also. as far as the scale problem, are you keeping the anvil clean when working the heated piece? if you have a lot of scale on the anvil, it will pound right back into your work. are you using a wire brush to remove it before cooling? you can also hit it on the anvil real quick before hammering to knock off a lot of the scale before working. also the same with water. after removing it from the fire and on your way to the anvil, dip in your cooling water very fast(in, out) and that will knock a lot of it off without losing your heat. hard to explain things like this, when you are just used to doing them without thinking about it. what heat source are you using for your forge?
 

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Looks nice. I tinker around with forging from time to time. I make knives but mainly do stock removal. I say throw a handle on it. I have some that never left the shop like that and remember them fondly whenever I come across them! A lot of the fun is in the doing
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I made it out of rebar, so I doubt that it will hold an edge for very long.

I have some coil springs I got at the scrap yard that I use for making tools that I could cut up and try and make a knife out of. I also have a bunch of old broken files I have picked up at yard sales specifically for this purpose. I just haven't made anything with them yet.

I've just started getting serious this spring about forging things. I have been mainly focusing on making tongs and tools and such when I get a chance. I had been using a homemade forge I made out of an old well pressure tank, but I recently bought an old champion lever forge that I have been restoring to use so I'll post pics in the DIY thread here when I'm done with it this winter. And on top of that my wife had our 1st child at the end of September so my free time for projects has been basically reduced to an hour here and there.

I did brush it a couple of times and I generally wipe all scale off my anvil in between heats, I was using up some free anthracite coal I was given and to keep that stuff going requires alot of air , also I was just screwing around so I wasn't really to concerned in my fire placement of the piece.

I've never seen anyone dip to get the scale off, I have seen spray bottles used before.
 

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I have been blacksmithing since the mid 80's, and did it for a living for several years. i used to do about 30 weekends a year at blackpowder events and craft shows in many different states. I used to make quite a few knives, but as many others got into knife making you just couldn't get the money you needed for them considering the time invested. nothing wrong with anthracite coal, that's all I have ever used. good hot and clean fire, ideal for making welds at all times with no fussing around. my portable unit had a large hand crank blower, which worked well to keep the fire going, plus I was busy enough throughout the day it was working it hard all the time. my forge in the shop has an electric blower which is no problem.

rebar is be made from anything they can get their hands on to melt. you never know from piece to piece what it made from. files are a better bet and you can always temper them in several different process's to get the hardness you are looking for. time is your friend, you can read a lot on the subject, watch video's and talk to people but, time at the forge will teach you much more. I could ramble on for hour's, but if I can be of any help, let me know.
 

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Sometimes you can run into older rebar that has carbon in it. New stuff, not likely. File sare good found material. Nicholson file sare generally 1095, Black Diamond are W1 or W2, both variants of 1095. Coil springs (older ones) are some form of 5160, 6150 or something similar. Same with leafs, tho really ols leafs can be a form of 1095. I have some off a Model A that are 1095. And Henry Ford lied, the vanadium in those springs is so low it wouldn't make a diffence
 
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