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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's been a little while since I've made the time, but I've always loved spending all night taking photos of meteors, Moon, star trails, comets, nebulae, etc... I also love thunderstorms and try to catch lightning on film. Both are pretty challenging hobbies...

My equipment:

Nikon FM-10 35mm
Meade ex70AT
Homemade piggy back mount
Homemade afocal mount
Equitorial telescope tripod
Remote shutter trigger

I've got tons of star trail with interesting foreground scenery and some with meteors, some cool long exposure constellation and comet pics, good quality closeups of the Moon, and a couple fuzzy pics of Jupiter and Saturn, and one picture of lightning. It's all on film though and I don't have a scanner to share them with you.

Really, if you'd like to try it, all you need is a manual camera, a couple lenses, a tripod and remote shutter trigger to get started with star trails and Moon closeups. My telescope is basically just used to piggyback the camera since it tracks the apparent movement of the sky as the Earth rotates....keeps the stars from trailing during a long exposure so the pics look like what you see with your own eyes. Occasionally I will take some magnified pics through the telescope, but its 70mm aperture keeps me bound to the Moon or maybe a planet in perfect atmospheric conditions. If you've got a scope 6" or more in aperture you can take magnified pics of much more....with A LOT of skill and practice.
 

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I done the Moon shoots and did some stars shot before. I wish I could get Planets I would love to try it. I just don't have the stuff to do it. I love doing the Night Shots with the camera on a tripod and use the remote.

I got some shots of lighting over the summer at day light.

I'll post some night shot's and the Lighting shots on another post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you want good pics of the planets, then you'll definitely need to find a large telescope. I would say at least 10" for a reflecting or 6" for an apochromatic scope...minimum. You need to collect as much light as possible in order to clearly distinguish features. However, you don't need an equatorial mount because your exposures would be kept to a second or two...so you can save some $$ there. I've made my own afocal camera mount that positions the camera lense just behind the eyepiece of a scope...out of a hose clamp, small piece of wood, and a small bolt (like on a tripod). Besides the planets, you can also get extreme closeups of the moon, etc.
 

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Can you post some pics here, I would like to see some. Some day I would love to learn that.
 

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I have some of a total solar eclipse taken with a Nikon FM2 55-200 zoom with 2x converter with X ray paper as a filter. Kodak color asa 400 film. That were very sharp in detail.
 

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MODEL37 said:
I have some of a total solar eclipse taken with a Nikon FM2 55-200 zoom with 2x converter with X ray paper as a filter. Kodak color asa 400 film. That were very sharp in detail.
Post those pic. up I like to see
 
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